Friday, November 8, 2013

KOA + KIRCBVI+Rocks #2 !





I've been evaluating children with cortical visual impairment/cerebral visual impairment for some time. Most of the children I see have multiple disabilities along with the visual impairment so my approach is a bit different from those whose specialty in low vision. The bottom line, of course, is to do all you can so your patient can do their very best.

Over the past 2 days I lectured to the folks from the Kansas Instructional Resource Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired and who are associated with the new but awesome KanLovKids program that provides low vision services for children with Pediatric Cortical Visual Impairment and other vision problems. They were an incredible audience. Click here for a copy of my course outline.

Click here for information about Visual Diagnosis and Care of the Patient with Special Needs (This text, which I helped to edit and write, was awarded First Prize by the British Medical Association this year.)

Thursday, November 7, 2013

KOA + KIRCBVI+Rocks!


 Spent 2 hrs lecturing on 3D Vision Syndrome: Research, Education and in Your Office to optometrists and teachers at the KOA Children's Vision and Learning Conference in Wichita.

Great audience! Great questions!

Thanks for inviting me to lecture.

3D Vision Syndrome and binocular vision dysfunction are epidemic in the USA. We need to diagnose and treat these most prevalent disorders!

My thanks to Drs. Press and Yang and Mr. Scrogan for allowing me to present information from our College of Optometrists in Vision Development 4 hour symposium on simulated 3D a few weeks ago!!

 For a copy of my handouts click here.

I had a chance to say hello to my old friend and colleague OEPers and COVDers Dr. Joe Sullivan and newer friend and colleague Dr. Julie Toon. Good to see you at this meeting!


Wednesday, November 6, 2013

AOA Poster Dealine Submission: Feb 7th 2014


Missing Link to Common Core State Standards

College of Optometrists in Vision Development Sheds Light on Missing Link to Common Core State Standards

Vision and Learning COVD
Vision and Learning COVD
Aurora, OH – The Common Core State Standards have been developed with the goal of better education for our students. The College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD), is excited about the potential of these standards to improve elementary and high school education in the United States, but explains there is a significant missing link to the system.  As COVD launches their annual National Children’s Vision and Learning Month campaign, they shine light on the missing link.
According to the Common Core State Standards Initiative website, “The Common Core State Standards provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them.”  The question is will everyone know exactly what to do to help the struggling students? 
Typically, children with vision problems that interfere with reading and learning slip through the system undetected.  Most children will have their vision tested by the school nurse and if they can see the letters on the eye chart a vision problem is considered to be ruled out.  “It is important to understand that vision screenings are just that, screenings,” explains Dr. David Damari, President of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development. “They are not designed to test for eye movement and eye coordination disorders that, according to many studies, including those by the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health, can significantly impact learning; they only test for visual acuity (how clearly one can see letters on the eye chart from a distance of 20 feet).” 
When children struggle with reading fluency, comprehension and attention problems, they often have eye coordination and eye movement disorders contributing to their difficulties.  Optometric and medical researchcontinues to show the connection between vision problems and academic performance. 
People from all walks of life have seen children go from struggling to succeeding once these vision problems have been treated. Parents, educators, physicians and pediatricians have joined COVD over the years to help spread the word that something can be done to help struggling students. For 2013, we have parents coming forward from all over the U.S. and the globe to share their stories.
“Our goal is to give everyone access to the research and general information on the impact that vision problems can have on education.  To do this we have redesigned our website to make it even easier to find this vital information,” Damari shares. “We invite you to visit our website, and also to subscribe to the COVD blog.  Last summer, our blog was named one of the Top 10 Influencers Making a Difference in the World of Eye Health by ShareCare (created by Jeff Arnold and Dr. Mehmet Oz, in partnership with Harpo Studios, Remark Media (NASDAQ: MARK), Sony Pictures Television, and Discovery Communications).”
About COVD
The College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD) is an international, non-profit optometric membership organization that provides education, evaluation, and board certification programs in behavioral and developmental vision care, vision therapy, and visual rehabilitation. The organization is comprised of doctors of optometry, vision therapists and other vision specialists. For more information on learning-related vision problems, vision therapy and COVD, please visit www.covd.org or call 888.268.3770.
A series of public service announcements (PSAs) are available at covd.org to help raise awareness that vision problems can not only interfere with learning, but sports performance, and other activities of daily living. These PSAs also address vision problems that impact individuals who have autism spectrum disorders or those who have suffered a head injury.

CONTACT: Pamela R. Happ, CAE
COVD Executive Director
888.268.3770 tel
Email: phapp@covd.org 
Website: www.covd.org

Sunday, November 3, 2013

Read what should be done...vs what is usually done. Sad.


ICBO: Call for Papers and Posters

CALL FOR PAPERS

International Conference of Behavioral Optometry
September 11-14, 2014 Birmingham, UK

The International Conference of Behavioral Optometry is soliciting abstracts for papers and posters to be presented at the 2014 Meeting. Any person wishing to make a presentation is invited to submit a proposal as outlined below.

 Proposals may include research results, case studies, or new and innovative diagnostic procedures or treatment techniques. Abstracts will be accepted as oral or poster presentations. Presenting authors must be registered participants and attend the meeting.

Submission of an abstract acknowledges your acceptance for the abstract to be published in all printed material of the Meeting Abstracts will be published in Optometry & Visual Performance.

Abstracts must be original and must not have been published or presented at any other meeting prior to the ICBO 2014 Meeting.
Abstracts must be submitted in English
All studies must have been approved by institutional committees on ethics of experimental and human investigations

Abstract title - limited to 20 words
Abstract text – limited to 350 words, including acknowledgements.

Abstracts of research projects should clearly state:
Background and aims
Methods
Results
Conclusions

Abstracts of case reports should clearly state:
patient’s symptoms, findings, diagnosis, treatments outcomes

Abstracts of diagnostic or therapeutic techniques should clearly describe:
the procedure, its applications, its unique or innovative characteristics.

Use only standard abbreviations; place special or unusual abbreviations in parentheses after the full word appears the first time. Use generic names of drugs. Express numbers as numerals.

Conflicts of Interest / Disclosure: Work submitted for presentation must include an acknowledgement of funding sources of commercial nature and/or consulting or holding of significant equity in a company that could be affected by the results of the study

THEME OF THE MEETING: Vision is the brain’s way of touching.
To maximize consideration for inclusion in the meeting you may choose to align your topic to the above stated theme or the tenets of behavioral vision care which follow:
The primary purpose of the visual process is the direction of action.
Most movement is visually guided.
Most visual problems are problems of omission, not commission.

SELECTION CRITERIA Each abstract will be reviewed for the following elements: (1) scientific and clinical quality; (2) broad appeal to the interests of the meeting attendees; (3) multidisciplinary nature; (4) timeliness of the topic.

Each complete submission received by December 1, 2013 will be independently peer-reviewed and rated on a blind evaluation basis.

First authors will be notified of acceptance or rejection by March 1, 2014.

AVOIDANCE OF COMMERCIALISM
All presentations must avoid commercialism. Presentations that constitute promotion and advertising will be prohibited. This specifically includes pervasive and inappropriate use of logos. No advertising matter of any description may be distributed. No material may be displayed that in any way directly promotes the commercial interest of any particular company or enterprise, or of the author(s)/presenter(s).

If the cost of presentation has been underwritten to any extent, a clear acknowledgment stating support and identifying the particular source should be included (e.g., "The support of [name of corporation/institute] for this project is gratefully acknowledged.")

ALL accepted presenters/authors/speakers are required to register for the conference, and are fully responsible for all of their expenses related to the conference (e.g., registration, airfare, hotel, meals).

Deadline for submission of abstracts: December 1, 2013 Submit electronically to: Paul.HarrisOD@gmail.com

 
Call for Posters

RULES FOR SUBMISSION

Please follow the instructions listed in this website step-by-step

o Abstracts will be accepted as oral or poster presentations
o Abstracts submitted by fax will not be accepted
o Presenting authors must be registered participants and attend the meeting
o Submission of an abstract acknowledges your acceptance for the abstract to be published in all printed material of the Meeting o Abstracts will be published in The Journal of Behavioral Optometry.
o Abstracts must be original and must not have been published or presented at any other meeting prior to the ICBO 2014 Meeting
o Abstracts must be submitted in English
o Conflicts of Interest / Disclosure: Work submitted for presentation must include an acknowledgement of funding sources of commercial nature and/or consulting or holding of significant equity in a company that could be affected by the results of the study
o All studies must have been approved by institutional committees on ethics of experimental and human investigations

ABSTRACT PREPARATION
Before you begin, please prepare the following information:
o Presenting author's contact details
o Email address
o Full postal address
o Daytime and evening phone number
o Author and co-authors' details o Full first and family name(s).
o Authors’ names must be in upper and lower case (J.J.C. Smith).
o Affiliation details: department, institution / hospital, city, state (if relevant), country

o Abstract title - limited to 20 words
o Abstract text – limited to 350 words, including acknowledgements.
  o Abstracts of research projects should clearly state:
o Background and aims
o Methods
o Results
o Conclusions

o Abstracts of case reports should clearly state:
o patient’s symptoms
o findings, diagnosis
o treatments o outcomes

o Abstracts of diagnostic or therapeutic techniques should clearly describe:
o the procedure o its applications
o its unique or innovative characteristics.
o Use only standard abbreviation; place special or unusual abbreviations in parentheses after the full word appears the first time.
o Use generic names of drugs. Express numbers as numerals.

THEME OF THE MEETING: Vision is the brain’s way of touching.
To maximize consideration for inclusion in the meeting you may choose to align your topic to the above stated theme or the tenets of behavioral vision care which follow:
o The primary purpose of the visual process is the direction of action.
o Most movement is visually guided.
o Most visual problems are problems of omission, not commission.

ABSTRACT SELECTION AND PRESENTATION
o Each abstract will be reviewed for the following elements:
 (1) scientific and clinical quality;
 (2) broad appeal to the interests of the membership;
(3) multidisciplinary nature;
 (4) timeliness of the topic.

Each complete submission received by December 1, 2013 will be independently peer-reviewed and rated on a blind evaluation basis.

Submit electronically to: mtaub@sco.edu

All abstracts will be reviewed by the Scientific Program Committee.
Presenting authors will be notified by March 1, 2014 regarding the status of their abstract