Monday, August 26, 2013

Neurocognitive testing more accurate than self-reporting when assessing concussion recovery in cheerleaders

Neurocognitive testing more accurate than self-reporting when assessing concussion recovery in cheerleaders

Concussions have become a major public health issue, with both short- and long-term side effects. In sports, cheerleading has the highest rate of catastrophic injury, with some studies reporting approximately 6% of total injuries as concussions. Return-to-play guidelines have relied on athletes' self-reports; however, this has led to concerns about the ability of athletes to truly recognize their own symptoms and recovery. In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers evaluate the accuracy of neurocognitive testing compared with self-reported symptoms of concussions in cheerleaders......

Comments: See  http://newsfromaoa.org/2013/07/11/high-tech-low-tech-and-concussion/ for additional info on concussion and sports. DM

Sunday, August 25, 2013

NIOS Conference and Gala Dinner

The Northern Ireland Optometric Society is having an outstanding program that us Yanks should be interested in as well.

Prof Bruce Evans has written several books and published numerous papers on many topics. His concept of orthoptics is not as expansive many of us consider vision therapy to be, but from reading his papers and books, you will take away a much better understanding of the topic.

Dr. J. Margaret (call her Maggie) Woodhouse is a remarkable individual. Listening to her lecture is worth the price of admission alone!

So, if you are looking for a good reason to go to the UK this fall...this is it! DM

Overthinking can be detrimental to human performance

Overthinking can be detrimental to human performance

Trying to explain riding a bike is difficult because it is an implicit memory. The body knows what to do, but thinking about the process can often interfere. So why is it that under certain circumstances paying full attention and trying hard can actually impede performance? A new UC Santa Barbara study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, reveals part of the answer......