Thursday, January 3, 2013

Nawlins Knowledge and Other Bits of Wisdom, Wit and Whimsy

Maino D. Nawlins Knowledge and Other Bits of Wisdom, Wit and Whimsy. Optom Vis Dev 2012;43(4): 158-160

Factors associated with Subsequent Eye Care for Children in Taiwan: A Population-based Historical Cohort Study

Factors associated with Subsequent Eye Care for Children in Taiwan: A Population-based Historical Cohort Study

Of 2464 children 28.9% had ocular conditions in 2005, and 56.5% and 44.7% of them didn't receive eye care during the subsequent 1- and 2-year periods, respectively. Among those with ocular conditions, the 3-4-year-olds were least likely to receive eye care ..... Children with highly educated fathers were more likely to receive eye care...... Despite the fact that Taiwan has a National Health Insurance Program, lack of subsequent eye care remains high, even when a child's ocular condition is known by the caregiver. .....

Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Neuropsychological evaluation and management of sport-related concussion

Neuropsychological evaluation and management of sport-related concussion

....As with adult populations, neuropsychological evaluation of children and adolescents diagnosed with Sports Related Concussion has documented skills and abilities that are particularly sensitive to head injury. Difficulties with attention and concentration, speed of information processing, and memory are commonly reported in the literature. There is also some evidence to suggest that younger children are particularly vulnerable to neurologic insult and are at greater risk for secondary consequences. Although such findings argue for more conservative management, the availability of diagnostic tools, including computerized neurocognitive assessment batteries, is limited.....

Comments: Don't forget all the oculo-visual anomalies associated with concussion such as convergence insufficiency, accommodative anomalies and oculomotor dysfunctions! See a functional optometrist for an appropriate diagnosis and therapy. Go to http://www.covd.org or if you live in Chicago go to http://www.LyonsFamilyEyeCare.com DM

Tuesday, January 1, 2013

Complementary and alternative therapies for children and adolescents with ADHD

Complementary and alternative therapies for children and adolescents with ADHD

...Many parents of children with ADHD are reluctant to pursue medication options and unable to access behavioral counseling. CAM therapies are often appealing to families and studies show that a large percentage of children with ADHD are treated with one or more CAM therapy. Most research studies evaluating CAM therapies are methodologically flawed, and often times there are inconsistencies across either study design or results. Although the American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend any CAM therapies for ADHD, essential fatty acid supplementation is likely well tolerated and modestly effective.....

Monday, December 31, 2012

Visual Sensitivity Improved By Control Of Brain Activity; May Have Implications For Stroke Patients

Visual Sensitivity Improved By Control Of Brain Activity; May Have Implications For Stroke Patients

....Training human volunteers to control their own brain activity in precise areas of the brain can enhance fundamental aspects of their visual sensitivity.... This non-invasive 'neurofeedback' approach could one day be used to improve brain function in patients with abnormal patterns of activity, for example stroke patients. ....Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at UCL used non-invasive, real-time brain imaging that enabled participants to watch their own brain activity on a screen, a technique known as neurofeedback. During the training phase, they were asked to try and increase activity in the area of the brain that processes visual information, the visual cortex, by imagining images and observing how their brains responded. ....

Comments: Functional optometrists already do this....it's called Optometric Vision Therapy! Go to http://www.COVD.org to find a doc who can help! DM

Sunday, December 30, 2012

Fragile X Study

The Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities (CIDD) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill would like to inform you of an exciting new research opportunity available to families with infants who have a child diagnosed with fragile X.

This multi-center study involves the collaboration of two sites which are part of an NIH-funded network (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Washington University in St. Louis, MO). At UNC, the lead investigator is Heather Cody Hazlett, PhD., she is well known in the field of developmental disabilities, and is currently assisting and leading four studies within the field of developmental disabilities. Currently, we are searching for 30 participants in the United States who meet the following criteria:

  • Are between 0-6 months of age (parents who are expecting may also be eligible)
  • Have diagnosis of  fragile X
Once a family is enrolled in this study, they will travel to Chapel Hill, NC for a comprehensive series of developmental, non-invasive assessments completed on the infant at the 6, 12 and 24 month time periods.  Also, during this trip the infant will receive an MRI scan while they sleep.  Between trips to Chapel Hill there will be phone conversations, genetic and environmental data collection.

There is no cost for family participation.  All travel and lodging costs are reimbursed by the study, and any services the study provides are at no charge to the family.  Families will receive feedback on the assessments and each MRI scan. I would like to speak with you further about participating in this research.  Please do not hesitate to contact me either by email or phone for more information.

Participating in this study is not the only way to get involved!  If this does not sound like something you are currently interested in, please consider sharing this information with your friends and family who may be interested in participating.

Please contact:


Heidi Bryant
Heidi.bryant@cidd.unc.edu   https://www.fragilexregistry.org/
Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities   
UNC-Chapel Hill, CB# 3367                          

Chapel Hill, NC  27599-3367            
             
Phone: (919) 966-5278
Toll-Free: (800) 793-5715
Fax: (919)843- 3825