Saturday, January 14, 2012

3D Technology: Increasing the Need for Optometric Vision Therapy3D Technology: Increasing the Need for Optometric Vision Therapy


3D Technology: Increasing the Need for Optometric Vision Therapy

by Toni Bristol

The use of 3D technology is growing exponentially. People who may have been able to ‘get by’ and adapt to life without depth perception or intermittent depth perception, are discovering they have a problem. When they go to their eye doctor what treatment options will be presented? Who will their eye doctor refer them to for optometric vision therapy? ....

Private Practice Residency

 Residency in Vision Therapy and Vision Rehabilitation in a Private Practice

Appelbaum Eye Care Associates, PC
6509 Democracy Blvd. 133 Defense Highway Suite 113
Bethesda, Maryland 20817 Annapolis, Maryland 21401
301-897-8484 301-897-8484




Program Supervisor: Dr. Stan Appelbaum
Email: eyepower2@gmail.com

 Please contact Dr. Appelbaum to schedule an interview
 Residency begins each year on the first day of July
 Interviews are scheduled throughout the year

The goal of this Southern College of Optometry Residency Program is to give graduate Optometrists
additional opportunities to expand their clinical knowledge and skills.

Description of Program: The program emphasizes the diagnosis and treatment of binocular vision and visual perceptual disorders. The resident will gain extensive experience in Vision Therapy for Adults and Children, Vision Improvement Programs, Pediatrics, Primary Care, Special Testing, Infants Vision, Head Trauma/Rehabilitation, Children with Special Needs, Therapeutic Lenses, Contact Lenses and Low Vision.

Location of the Residency: Bethesda and Annapolis, Maryland
Number of Positions: 1 Application Deadline: February 1
Accreditation: Accredited by The Accreditation Council of Optometric Education (ACOE)
Use ORMS Matching Service: Yes contact: www.optometryresident.org

For additional information contact:
Dr. Cheryl Ervin
Director of Residency Programs
Southern College of Optometry
1245 Madison Avenue
Memphis, T2 38104-2218
901-722-3201 www.sco.edu
cervin@sco.edu

Stanley A. Appelbaum OD, FCOVD
Board Certified in Vision Therapy by
the College of Optometrists in Vision Development
6509 Democracy Blvd.
Bethesda, Maryland 20817
--
133 Defense Highway Suite 113
Annapolis, Maryland 21401
301-897-8484 www.visionhelp.com
eyepower2@gmail.com

NeurologyAdvance Online

NeurologyAdvance Online: Check it out!

Learn Street Skateboarding through 3D Simulations of Angle Rotations

Learn Street Skateboarding through 3D Simulations of Angle Rotations    
Learning physical activities such as sports and games is expensive and time-consuming. A common advice is "repetition makes perfection," which implies that wrong actions must soon be noticed and avoided. ...... A computer software application allows a user to see an object through a three dimensional experience by rotating the object. We adopt this technique to introduce a 3D medium that allows its user to view how skateboarding tricks are done. S...... User test results show that using the software is a more effective means to learn skateboarding compared to watching a video demonstration. .... the 3D simulation application could be used to learn other sports and games, since most of them show a repeated hand-stroke, leg movement, or jumping posture. The approach discussed in this paper opens a venue to learn sports and games in a more interactive, efficient, and cost-effective way...                                                                                     Comments: If this 3D training tools works for sports....can you imagine what would happen if we used it for optometric vision therapy? DM
                      
 
  

Friday, January 13, 2012

AN EXPLORATORY STUDY: PROLONGED PERIODS OF BINOCULAR STIMULATION CAN PROVIDE AN EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR CHILDHOOD AMBLYOPIA

AN EXPLORATORY STUDY: PROLONGED PERIODS OF BINOCULAR STIMULATION CAN PROVIDE AN EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR CHILDHOOD AMBLYOPIA

This study explored the potential for treating childhood amblyopia with prolonged periods of binocular stimulation.Strabismic, anisometropic and strabismic and anisometropic amblyopes participated in a dichoptic perceptual learning task (AKA vision therapy). A statistically significant improvement in the mean visual acuity of the amblyopic eye was noted. Stereopsis was seen for the first time in 3 subjects. The vision therapy/perceptual learning therapy use improved both monocular VA and depth perception. 

Comment: Optometrists, especially developmental optometrists, have long used binocular optometric vision therapy as an integral part of treating amblyopia (lazy eye). This research supports this methodology of treatment and demonstrates that amblyopia is a binocular vision problem and not just a problem with the clarity of vision (visual acuity). All eye care professionals should use binocular vision therapy to improve not only visual acuity but also depth perception and other visual perceptual, visual spatial, accommodative (focusing), oculomotor and all other vision processing deficits associated with amblyopia. To find a doctor who can help diagnose and treat amblyopia please go to the College of Optometrists in Vision Development, Optometric Extension Program Foundation, American Optometric Association, American Academy of Optometry and the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry websites. Click here for more info on amblyopia. See also: Help Your Patients See 3D and Identifying Binocular Vision Disorders. DM

 

Computer Tips and Tricks


Computer Tips and Tricks
by Christopher Grant

As an Information Technology (IT) Services provider to the Healthcare industry, we receive calls and emails every day relating to computer issues from prospective clients. After a brief conversation, we find that some of the issues could have been resolved by the callers themselves. The calls range from very simple preventative maintenance activities, to
complex issues such as dealing with viruses, malware, spyware,
computers running slowly, and many other important and potentially devastating problems.
Don’t get me wrong, Grant-Tech LLC is in business to make a  rofit and are always available
to assist our clients with technology issues. There are some things, however, you can do yourself and at the same time save some money while keeping your computers in “Tip Top Shape.” This will keep your computers available to you and your staff when you need them most.
...

Comments: To read more click on the title above. DM

Glasses, Patching Work for Rogue Form of Lazy Eye


Glasses, Patching Work for Rogue Form of Lazy Eye

Pang Y, et al "A prospective pilot study of treatment outcomes for amblyopia associated with myopic anisometropia" Arch Ophthalmol 2012; DOI: 10.1001/archopthalmol.2011.1203. 

I am very proud of my ICO colleagues, Yi Pang, MD, OD, PhD; Christine Allison, OD; Kelly A. Frantz, OD; Sandra Block, OD, MEd; and Geoffrey W. Goodfellow, OD. What a great paper! 

Both refractive correction and patching significantly improved the VA of the amblyopic eye associated with myopic anisometropia, with 88% of participants' eyes improving 2 lines or more. Further improvement in VA was observed when patching plus near activities was added to refractive correction and patients were followed for 16 more weeks. We recommend that clinicians treat myopic anisometropic amblyopia with refractive correction and patching plus near activities.

DM

Reading, Attention and Vision Training for Convergence Insufficiency

Reading, Attention and Vision Training for Convergence Insufficiency

.....When it comes to reading, the experts agree that phonological decoding is an important aspect of the ability to learn how to read.  Vision is assumed to not be important as long as a person can see "20/20".  Often overlooked is vision's primary role in attention while learning any task - a skill that has little to do with "20/20"  Reading and writing in particular demand accurate control over visual attention, and the sub-components - convergence and accommodation.  Otherwise known as "eye-teaming", "focussing" and "tracking". 

 Vision and Reading
Learning to read involves many different components.  Many children learn to read, despite having eye-teaming and focussing problems, like Convergence Insufficiency and Accommodation Dysfunction.  Though these children often start to struggle as print gets smaller, or suffer with headaches and sore eyes.  Many just suffer concentration loss, leading to symptoms of avoidance. Children who read from meaning, rather than word by word, might cope with mild visual difficulties until they have to do a task that requires more sustained attention on each letter or word such as required when writing......

Practice, practitioner, or placebo? A multifactorial, mixed-methods randomized controlled trial of acupuncture

Practice, practitioner, or placebo? A multifactorial, mixed-methods randomized controlled trial of acupuncture

....The nonspecific effects of acupuncture are well documented; we wished to quantify these factors in osteoarthritic (OA) pain, examining needling, the consultation, and the practitioner. ..... Qualitative analysis indicated that patients’ beliefs about treatment veracity and confidence in outcomes were reciprocally linked. .... Improvements occurred from baseline, but acupuncture has no specific efficacy over either placebo. The individual practitioner and the patient’s belief had a significant effect on outcome. The 2 placebos were equally as effective and credible as acupuncture. Needle and nonneedle placebos are equivalent. ....... Beliefs about treatment veracity shape how patients self-report outcome, complicating and confounding study interpretation. ....

A Novel Three-Dimensional Tool for Teaching Human Neuroanatomy

A Novel Three-Dimensional Tool for Teaching Human Neuroanatomy

Three-dimensional (3D) visualization of neuroanatomy can be challenging for medical students. This knowledge is essential in order for students to correlate cross-sectional neuroanatomy and whole brain specimens within neuroscience curricula and to interpret clinical and radiological information as clinicians or researchers. This study implemented and evaluated a new tool for teaching 3D neuroanatomy to first-year medical students ...... Our results suggest that our 3D physical modeling activity is an effective method for teaching spatial relationships of brain anatomy and will better prepare students for visualization of 3D neuroanatomy, a skill essential for higher education in neuroscience, neurology, and neurosurgery.....

 

 

Thursday, January 12, 2012

New Journal

The following new journal from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press has been added to PubMed Central:

Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
ISSN: 2157-1422 (electronic)
Archive includes volume 1 (2011)
Note: There is no embargo delay for this journal.

Assessment of Visuospatial Neglect in Stroke Patients Using Virtual Reality: A Pilot Study

Assessment of Visuospatial Neglect in Stroke Patients Using Virtual Reality: A Pilot Study

One of the neuropsychological deficits that can result from a stroke is the neglect phenomenon. .... The purpose of this explorative study is to investigate whether it is possible to assess neglect in the extrapersonal space based on the performance of acute stroke patients, chronic stroke patients and healthy elderly in orientation and exploration tasks when immersed in a three-dimensional (3D)- virtual environment. ..... In the easiest level significant differences between the groups were found for total time spent in the test, mean response time left field of vision, and mean response time in the left field of vision of the left virtual reality environment. Differences in search patterns showed that subacute stroke patients had a much more fuzzy search pattern in scanning the environment than healthy elderly and chronic stroke patients. With respect to the more difficult level results showed significant differences between healthy elderly and the total group of stroke patients. The results of this study suggest that a 3D neglect test by means of virtual reality has the potential to detect and measure unilateral neglect....

 

The Eyes Have It: 3D and Vision Health


The Eyes Have It: 3D and Vision Health


By Len Scrogan, Digital Learning Architect

 
Clearly, one of the challenges we face in increasing the footprint of 3D is educating the public. For example, did you know:

• 53% of parents surveyed* believe 3D viewing is harmful to a child’s vision or eyes?
• Nintendo warns in their health and safety information that children below the age of six should not use 3D technology?


• Neither of the above concerns have a foundation in fact, based on past and current research?

* Based on the American Optometric Association’s (AOA) 2011 American Eye-Q ® survey....

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

A Nurses Guide to Communicating and Interacting with Patients with Disabilities–Webinar


The Illinois Disability and Health Program is pleased to inform you of an upcoming webinar we are co-hosting with the Western Illinois Area Health Education Center/i-NET.  The Webinar is designed to provide nurses, social workers, and other interested healthcare providers with an increased understanding and insight into how to care for and communicate more effectively with patients with disabilities, including those with sensory, physical, and cognitive limitations.  

DATE:  March 15, 2012
TIME:  12:00 – 1:00 (with question and answer session at the end of the presentation).
1 Nursing Contact Hour or 1 Social Worker Clock Hour will be available.  There is no cost for the Webinar or CEUs. 

Please see the attached flyer for more information and a printable registration form or register online at: 

Feel free to help us spread the word!! 
If you have any questions or need any accomodation to participate in this webinar, please contact me. 
Thanks! 

Carla Cox, MPH, CHES Program Manager, Disability and Health
Illinois Department of Public Health 535 W. Jefferson Street Springfield, IL 62761 217-557-2939 Fax:  217-782-1235
"Having a disability does not mean you can't be healthy."  U.S. Surgeon General, 2005



Severe Complications of Strabismus Surgery Outcomes: A national Surveillance Study

Severe Complications of Strabismus Surgery Outcomes: A national Surveillance Study
J A Bradbury, R H Taylor Bradford                 Royal Infirmary 



......A survey which involved a letter being sent to every Ophthalmology Consultant in the UK on a monthly basis with a list of conditions being surveyed, if a severe complication of strabismus surgery occurred in the previous month this was reported to the lead investigator .... They were then sent a follow questionnaire 6 months later. This paper reports the outcomes at 6 month .....

Complications: 14 globe perforations, 14 slipped muscles, 6 surgically induced necrotising scleritis, 5 intra operatvely lost muscles, 12 orbital infections, 1 retinal detachment, and one case who had an evisceration and probably had endophthalmitis. 

Comments: Although these severe outcomes were out of a total of 2800 surgical interventions, all are sight threatening and in some cases, blinding in nature. I also question the methodology. This survey did not ask if there were any other non-strabismus surgery complications from other potential problems such as the anesthetic and infection not directly related to the actually surgery. This is a self-reporting survey that, as in all such surveys, leave the investigator at the mercy of those reporting the complications. I am waiting to see the paper published to determine if there was any of follow-up to determine if the self-reporting was accurate or not. Although most strabismus surgeries have few complications, there is always the possibility of the unexpected, serious problem. DM

The epidemiology of new versus recurrent sports concussions among high school athletes, 2005–2010

The epidemiology of new versus recurrent sports concussions among high school athletes, 2005–2010

....Athletes sustaining recurrent concussions had longer symptom resolution times, were kept out of play longer and reported loss of consciousness more frequently than athletes sustaining new concussions. With the possibility of long-term impairment and other negative sequelae, proper management and prevention of concussions at the high school level is imperative.  ....

Comments: If you are an individual who has sustained a head injury....even a mild one...lingering visual and visual perceptual problems could be making daily living activities very difficult. If this has occurred to you go to your nearest school or college of optometry clinic and set up an appointment with their disabilities eye care service. In Chicago-land that means the Illinois Eye Institute 312-949-7280 and ask to set up an appointment with Dr. Dominick Maino in the Disabilities Service. I know, I know...shameless self promotion....but if it helps just one person...well, I will suffer the indignity of it all!! (;-}> DM

Comparison of Traditional Methods with 3D Computer Models in the Instruction of Hepatobiliary Anatomy

Comparison of Traditional Methods with 3D Computer Models in the Instruction of Hepatobiliary Anatomy

This study was designed to determine whether an interactive three-dimensional presentation depicting liver and biliary anatomy is more effective for teaching medical students than a traditional textbook format presentation of the same material. ........ While the interactive 3D multimedia module received higher satisfaction ratings from students, it neither enhanced nor inhibited learning of complex hepatobiliary anatomy compared to an informationally equivalent traditional textbook style approach.......

 

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Literature Review: Reading, Writing, Vision


Palomo-Álvarez C, Puell MC. Binocular
function in school children with reading difficulties.
Graefe’s Archive for Clinical and Experimental
Ophthalmology 2010;248:885-892.


Dusek W, Pierscionek BK, McClelland JF. A
survey of visual function in an Austrian population
of school-age children with reading and writing
difficulties. BioMed Central Ophthalmology
2010;10:16:1-10. (open access at:
www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2415/10/16).


Thiagarajan P, Lakshminarayanan V, Bobier WR. Effect of vergence adaptation and positive
fusional vergence training on oculomotor parameters. Optometry and Vision Science 2010;87:487-493.






The Science – Vision problem or ADHD?

COVDBlog:The Science – Vision problem or ADHD?

....I have just spent sometime venturing through the blogosphere of mothers with children with ADHD.  I was so impressed with these brave women that write about their experiences, triumphs, and challenges in raising their children with ADHD.  Many of their accounts truly broke my heart.  This is an excerpt from Penny Williams blog “A Mom’s View of ADHD” where she describes her experience of trying to find a good fit for educating her son with ADHD:....

Comments: Read more by clicking on the title above. DM

3rd Annual AOS Meeting and CE Seminar



3rd Annual AOS Meeting and CE Seminar

3D in the Class Room: 3D Simulation Technology as an Effective Instructional Tool for Enhancing Spatial Visualization Skills in Apparel Design

3D Simulation Technology as an Effective Instructional Tool for Enhancing Spatial Visualization Skills in Apparel Design

The purpose of this study is to explore the effectiveness of 3D simulation technology for enhancing spatial visualization skills in apparel design education and further to suggest an innovative teaching approach using the technology. ........ The results affirm that 3D simulation technology has positive potential as an efficient instructional tool for improving students' visualization skills in apparel design.....

 

Monday, January 9, 2012

Neuro-optometric Rehabilitation Association Annual Meeting

Neuro-optometric Rehabilitation Association   2012 
Annual Conference 

April 19 to 22

University of Memphis Holiday Inn
  3700 Central Avenue, Memphis, TN 38111
(901) 678-8200
  Call for Hotel Reservation:  901 678-5410 
Contact: Robert Williams
ph: 866-222-3887
email: Noraoptometric@yahoo.com
Airport Code: MEM

Board meeting on Wednesday April 18
Skills on Thursday-Friday, April 19-20
General Conference Saturday and Sunday April 21-22
Exhibits Friday evening through Sunday noon.
Contact:
Robert Williams
866-222-3887
noraoptometric@yahoo.com

Upcoming Preview NORA 2012 Annual Conference

April 19-20 NORA General Skills Program

Skills Curriculum-Level 1
Skills Curriculum-Level 2
Skills Curriculum-Advanced Coursework

Svetlana Mustagova, PhD
"The Effect of MNRI Visual-Auditory-Vestibular Reflex Integration on Fine Motor Coordination & School Skills."

April 20 - Friday night (7 - 9 pm) kickoff

Tom Politzer,OD & Amy Berryman,OTR/L
Hospital Based Visual Neurorehabilitation

April 21-22 NORA General Meeting

Early Morning Exhibitor Education to be annouced

General Conference Speakers

Keynote - Susan Barry, PhD Vision Rehabilitation-A Neuroscientist's View
Ron Hruska, PT
Postural Control and Vision
Caitlin Hudac, PhD candidate at the University of Nebraska James Nedrow,OD
VEP changes in TBI Population
Selwyn Super, D.Optom., MEd, PhD
Neurorehabilitation Optometry from a Multivariate Neurocognitive Developmental Perspective
Curt Baxstrom, OD
USI-Deficit in Spatial or Bilateral Processing?
Bridgett Wallace, PT, PhD
Concussions-Overview of Current Knowledge and Treatment
Jason Clopton, OD
Neurotransmitters in Rehabilitation
Heidi Clopton, OTR/L
Nutritional Considerations in Neurorehabilitation

Thursday night: Clinical Skills Presentations

  • Program will fill up fast, so get your request in now. There are only 2 or 3 speaker slots left.
  • Contact Curriculum Co-Chairperson

Student Grant Program

  • Information will be by email to the NORA Student Liaisons at each Optometry School site.
  • Contact the NORA Student Committee Chairperson Sarah Lane, OD: selane802@gmail.com

Submit a poster or a paper on a topic on "Neuro Rehabilitation"

Deadline is January 15, 2012
Contact Program Conference Co-Chairperson:

Vision is More than 20/20

One of my colleagues put this up on his Facebook page. I thought I would pass it along on MainosMemos.


There's More to Good Vision than 20/20 from r c on Vimeo.


If you need more than just an assessment of 20/20 seeing...go to the College of Optometrists in Vision Development webpage at http://www.COVD.org to find a doctor who can help. You can also go to the Optometric Extension Program Foundation webpage at http://www.OEPF.org to find docs as well. These two fine organizations' membership are composed of health care professionals in diagnosing and treating binocular vision and learning related vision problems with optometric vision therapy. COVD certifies their doctors upon completion of its rigorous Fellowship program. As a Fellow of COVD (and editor of COVD's journal, Optometry & Vision Development,  as well as a member of OEPF), I am not unbiased....but I know if you want to find doctors who are well trained and have met high standards of excellence you can't beat Fellows of COVD as a resource. DM

Chicago Concussion Coalition: Friend & Fund Raiser


Visual Cortical Function in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Without Retinal or Cerebral Pathology

Visual Cortical Function in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Without Retinal or Cerebral Pathology

......Preterm infants with VLBW had measurable and significant changes in cortical responsiveness that were correlated with gestational age. These results suggest that premature birth in the absence of identifiable retinal or neurological abnormalities has a significant effect on visual cortical sensitivity at 5 – 7 months corrected age, and that gestational age is an important factor for visual development......

3D in the Classroom: Utilising a Collaborative Macro-Script to Enhance Student Engagement: A Mixed Method Study in a 3D Virtual Environment

Utilising a Collaborative Macro-Script to Enhance Student Engagement: A Mixed Method Study in a 3D Virtual Environment
  This study examines the effect of using an online 3D virtual environment in teaching Mathematics in Primary Education. ......... The findings indicate that the 3D virtual environment actively engages the students' interest and leads to richer interaction between them. This in turn results in a higher level of student engagement in the collaborative learning process. .....
 

Vision Related Quality of Life among Urban Low-Income Black Seniors Participating in an Eye Care Program: Effect after New Spectacles

............The most recent issue of Optometry & Vision Development (OVD), the official journal of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development has research and other articles that may surprise the general population. Did you know that a simple pair of glasses can significantly improve your quality of life? Researcher, Dr. Janis Winters of the Illinois College of Optometry/Illinois Eye Institute, in her paper, Vision Related Quality of Life among Urban Low-Income Black Seniors Participating in an Eye Care Program: Effect after New Spectacles, has shown that poor, elderly, under-represented minorities show a significant and positive change in the individual’s perception of their overall quality of life. When the National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire was given to the participants before and after spectacle wear a significant difference was found with wearing the glasses. The general health, general vision, ocular pain, and distance activities, as well as near activities, social functioning, color vision, peripheral vision, and mental health subscales compared to first administration of the survey were also significantly different when the spectacles were worn. This paper strongly supports how an individual’s quality of life can improve just by wearing glasses. It is unfortunate that so many cannot afford or do not have access to optometric eye and vision care.......

Comments: My friend and colleague, Dr. Janis Winters, at the Illinois College of Optometry recently published this article in Optometry & Vision Development. As editor of this journal, I am somewhat biased....but it is an article that clearly shows how optometry can improve the quality of life for all individuals... no matter their age or socioeconomic level. Let us all strive to make sure that Americans, and all within our world, receive the eye and vision care they require. With uncorrected refractive error being the most frequently encountered cause of preventable visual impairment in the world; we, as health care professionals, have a moral, ethical, and fiduciary duty to provide the services and materials needed so that all of mankind can benefit through-out the world.

Please see:
Global magnitude of visual impairment caused by uncorrected refractive errors in 2004
Serge Resnikoff,a Donatella Pascolini,a Silvio P Mariottia & Gopal P Pokharela

What is the global burden of visual impairment? Lalit Dandona and Rakhi Dandona

 Please enjoy this issue of Optometry & Vision Development and watch for the next one to arrive soonest! DM

Sunday, January 8, 2012

Vision Related Quality of Life among Urban Low-Income Black Seniors Participating in an Eye Care Program: Effect after New Spectacles


Vision Related Quality of Life among Urban Low-Income Black Seniors Participating in an Eye Care Program: Effect after New Spectacles

by Janis Ecklund Winters OD, FAAO

Abstract
 
Purpose. This study evaluates the effect of prescribing and updating spectacle correction on visual function using the 25-item National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire (VFQ-25) in low-income African-American seniors dwelling in public housing.
Methods: Seventy-three residents were recruited from the community and received a comprehensive eye and vision care evaluation. The VFQ-25 was administered after the initial examination and again after spectacles were dispensed. Additional data was obtained using a retrospective record review.
Results: As might be suspected, the majority of those individuals evaluated initially complained of
blurry vision. Those classified as ‘not visually impaired at distance or near’ increased by 27% after receiving a refractive correction. Fifty-nine of the subjects (77.9%) completed both administrations of the National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire. A statistically significant increase in the mean score was found for the second administration of the composite score and the general health, general vision, ocular pain, distance activities, and near activities, as well as, social functioning, color vision, peripheral vision, and mental health subscales compared to first administration.
Conclusions: After new spectacles were received, a positive change in VFQ-25 scores was noted. Many factors may have contributed to these results. These findings illustrate the large impact a pair of spectacles can have on a population facing barriers to obtaining eyecare.

Introduction to Optometric Vision Therapy

Good eyesight(seeing 20/20) is different than good vision. Vision is learned over time. If the visual system is not properly trained some issues could be reversing words while reading, loosing ones place, or difficultly shifting focus. Optometric Vision Therapy can solve these issues.




Addittional resources include:

College of Optometrists in Vision Development


Optometric Extension Program Foundation

VisionHelpBlog

MainosMemosBlog (of course!)

Optometry & Vision Development 

Maino D. Mistakes were made (Yes by you!). Optom Vis Dev
2011;42(2):66-69.

PubMed
Borsting E, Mitchell GL, Kulp MT, Scheiman M, Amster DM, Cotter S, Coulter RA, Fecho G, Gallaway MF, Granet D, Hertle R, Rodena J, Yamada T; the CITT Study Group.
Optom Vis Sci. 2012 Jan;89(1):12-18.

Scheiman M, Cotter S, Kulp MT, Mitchell GL, Cooper J, Gallaway M, Hopkins KB, Bartuccio M, Chung I; Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial Study Group.
Optom Vis Sci. 2011 Nov;88(11):1343-52.

Scheiman M, Kulp MT, Cotter S, Mitchell GL, Gallaway M, Boas M, Coulter R, Hopkins K, Tamkins S; Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial Study Group.
Optom Vis Sci. 2010 Aug;87(8):593-603.

Rouse M, Borsting E, Mitchell GL, Kulp MT, Scheiman M, Amster D, Coulter R, Fecho G, Gallaway M; CITT Study Group.
Optom Vis Sci. 2009 Oct;86(10):1169-77.

Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial Study Group.
Optom Vis Sci. 2009 Sep;86(9):1096-103.

Scheiman M, Rouse M, Kulp MT, Cotter S, Hertle R, Mitchell GL.
Optom Vis Sci. 2009 May;86(5):420-8.









Authors/Chapters: Visual Diagnosis and Care of the Patient with Special Needs




Marc B. Taub, OD, MS, FAAO, FCOVD,
Mary Bartuccio, OD, FAAO, FCOVD,  
Dominick M. Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD-A

Chapter 1-Maino  The Life Cycle Approach to Care for Patients with Special Needs

Chapter 2 Genetics
  • Charles Connor, OD, PhD, FAAO Professor, Southern College of Optometry

Chapter 3  Cerebral Palsy

Chapter 4 Down syndrome
  • J. Margaret Woodhouse, OD Senior Lecturer, Cardiff University College of Optometry and Vision Sciences
  • Dominick M. Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD-A Professor, Illinois College of Optometry

Chapter 5  Fragile X syndrome
  • Elizabeth Berry-Kravis, MD, PhD Associate Professor, Rush University Medical Center
  • Dominick M. Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD-A Professor, Illinois College of Optometry

Chapter 6 Intellectual Disabilities of Unknown Etiology
  • Karen Kehbein, OD Assistant Professor, Michigan College of Optometry, Ferris State University
  • Marc B. Taub, OD, MS, FAAO, FCOVD Assistant Professor, Southern College of Optometry

Chapter 7  Oculo-Visual Abnormalities Associated with Rare Neurodevelopmental Disorders
·         Daniel Smith, OD, FAAO Assistant Professor, Southern College of Optometry

Chapter 8 Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Rachel A. Coulter, OD, FAAO, FCOVD Associate Professor, Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry

Chapter 9 Acquired Brain Injury
  • Kenneth Ciuffreda, OD, PhD, FAAO, FCOVD-A Professor, State University of New York College of Optometry
  • Neera Kapoor, OD, MS, FAAO Associate Professor, State University of New York College of Optometry

Chapter 10 Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
·         Terry Browning, PHD Bartlett, TN
·         Mary Bartuccio, OD, FAAO, FCOVD Assistant Professor, Assistant Professor, Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry

Chapter 11 Learning Disabilities
  • Garth Christianson, OD, MSEd, FAAO, FCOVD
  • Eric Borstring, OD, FAAO, FCOVD Professor, Southern California College of Optometry

Chapter 12 Psychiatric Illness
  • Pam Schnell, OD, FAAO Assistant Professor, Southern College of Optometry
  • Dominick M. Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD-A Professor, Illinois College of Optometry
  • Robert C. Jespersen, MD Victor C. Neumann Family Services, Chicago, Illinois

Chapter 13 Neurodegenerative Diseases
  • Denise A. Valenti, OD Haverford Vanguard Medical Associates, Braintree, Massachusetts

Chapter 14 Cortical Visual Impairment
  • Barry Kran OD, FAAO, Perkins School for the Blind, Watertown, MA
  • Luisa Mayer, PhD, MEd, Perkins School for the Blind, Watertown, MA

Chapter 15 Vision Screening
  • Mary Bartuccio, OD, FAAO, FCOVD Assistant Professor, Assistant Professor, Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry
  • Nadine Girgis, OD Instructor, Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry

Chapter 16 Comprehensive Examination Procedures
  • Marc B. Taub, OD, MS, FAAO, FCOVD Assistant Professor, Southern College of Optometry

Chapter Diagnosis and Treatment of Refractive Error
  • James Newman, OD, FAAO Professor, Southern College of Optometry

Chapter 18 Diagnosis and Treatment of Oculomotor Dysfunction
  • Paul Harris, OD, FAAO, FVOVD, FACBO Associate Professor , Southern College of Optometry

Chapter 19 Diagnosis and Treatment of Binocular Vision and Accommodative Dysfunction
  • Erin Jenewein, MS, OD, Assistant Professor, Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry
  • Kelley Meehan, OD Instructor, Mid-Western University College of Optometry

Chapter 20 Diagnosis and Treatment of Strabismus and Amblyopia
  • Jackie Rodena, OD Assistant Professor, Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry
  • Yin Tea, OD, FAAO Assistant Professor, Nova Southeastern University College of

Chapter 21 Diagnosis and Treatment of Vision Information Processing Disorders
  • Deborah Amster, OD, FAAO, FCOVD Assistant Professor, Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry

Chapter 22-Diagnosis and Treatment of Commonly Diagnosed Ocular Health Anomalies 
  • William Kress, OD Instructor-Southern College of Optometry
  • Jon Neal, OD Instructor-Southern College of Optometry
  • Andrew Rixon, OD Assistant Professor-Southern College of Optometry

Chapter 23 Special Assessment Procedures
  • Maryke Neiberg, OD, FAAO Associate Professor, Western University College of Optometry
  • Scott Steinman, OD, PhD, FAAO

Chapter 24  Neuro-Plasticity 
Maino
·         Dominick M. Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD-A Professor, Illinois College of Optometry
·         Robert Donati, PhD Associate Professor, Illinois College of Optometry
·         Yi Pang, OD, PhD, FAAO Associate Professor, Illinois College of Optometry
·         Stephen Viola, PhD  Affiliate Assistant Professor, University of  Missouri-St. Louis
·         Susan Barry, PhD Professor, Mt. Holyoake College
Chapter 25-Optometric Treatment 
  • Curt Baxstrom OD, FCOVD Vision and Learning Center, Federal Way, Washington
  • Jason Clopton, OD, FCOVD Center of Vision Development, Cookeville, Tennessee, Adjunct Professor, Southern College of Optometry
  • Samantha Slotnick, OD, FAAO, FCOVD, Manhattan Vision Associates/Institute for Vision Research
·         Patricia S. Lemer, M. Ed., NCC Executive Director of Developmental Delay Resources Pittsburgh, PA 
Chapter 26- Complementary and Alternative Approaches
·         Patricia S. Lemer, M. Ed., NCC Executive Director of Developmental Delay Resources Pittsburgh, PA 

Chapter 27-Technology for Rehabilitation, Treatment and Enhancement  
  • Jeffrey Cooper, MS, OD, FAAO Clinical Professor, State University of New York College of Optometry
  • Sidney Groffman, OD, FAAO, FCOVD Professor, State University of New York College of Optometry
  • Paul Harris, OD, FAAO, FCOVD, FACBO Southern College of Optometry
  • Marc B. Taub, OD, MS, FAAO, FCOVD Southern College of Optometry

Chapter 28
Inter-Disciplinary Approach
  • Robert Hohendorf, OD Vision and Sensory Center of Michigan, Wyoming, Michigan
  • Robin Lewis, OD, FCOVD Family Optometry, Chandler, Arizona
  • Orli Weisser-Pike, OTR/L, CLVT, SCLV University of Tennessee Medical Group
  • Monika Kolwaite, PT/R, Brain Injury Coordinator at Baptist Memorial Hospital
  • Julie L. Marshall, MA, CCC-SLP Clinical Assoc Professor AUSP, University of Memphis
  • Deborah Schrager-Hoffnung PhD –Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE
  • Pamela Compart, MD Baltimore, MD
  • Danielle L. Hinton, MD-Baptist Hospital Rehabilitation, Memphis, TN
·         Elizabeth Bishop, MSSW UT Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities
  • Fred Higadi, MD

Chapter 29 Disabilities and the Education System
  • David A. Damari, OD, FCOVD, FAAO Professor, Southern College of Optometry

Chapter 30  The Optometric Practice and Special Populations
  • Jason Clopton, OD Center of Vision Development, Cookeville, Tennessee, Adjunct Professor, Southern College of Optometry
  • Dan Fortenbacher, OD, FCOVD Wow Vision Therapy, St. Joseph, Michigan
  • Bradley Habermehl, OD, FCOVD Flint, MI, Adjunct Professor, Southern College of Optometry

Chapter 31-Communication
  • Len Press OD, FAAO, FCOVD Family Eyecare Associates, Fairlawn, New Jersey
  • Nancy Torgerson OD, FCOVD Alderwood Vision Therapy Center, Lynnwood, Washington