Saturday, December 31, 2011

New Fellows of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development

New Fellows of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development

The following individuals have completed all of the requirements so that they have obtained Fellowship status in the College of Optometrists in Vision Development. COVD offers optometrists and vision therapists the opportunity to become certified in vision development and vision therapy.   The Board certification process is administered by the International Examination and Certification Board (IECB).  The IECB process includes a rigorous evaluation of the eye care professional's knowledge and abilities in providing developmental and behavioral vision care for patients. The same holds true for certified therapists. Congratulations to all of my colleagues!  DM


Christina Danley, OD, FCOVD Franklin, TN
Leanna Dudley, OD, FCOVD Lakewood, CO
Eric Dukes, OD, FCOVD Ashland, OR
Rosalie Lee Hopkins, OD, FCOVD Simpsonville, SC
Tobias Herrmann, MSc, FCOVD-I Zizers Gr, Switzerland
David W. Jensen, OD, FCOVD Iowa City, IA
Helen Kendra Lee, OD, FCOVD Sunnyvale, CA
Lynn Ann Lowell, OD, FCOVD Plano, TX
Debbie Luk, OD, FCOVD Calgary, AB, Canada
Gabrielle Marshall, OD, FCOVD Bend, OR
Maura Massucci, OD, FCOVD Brooklyn, NY
Cynthia Matyas, OD, FCOVD Cambridge, ON, Canada
Jenna W. McDermed, OD, FCOVD Orlando, FL
Alan Pearson, OD, FCOVD Bethell, WA
Angela Peddle, OD, FCOVD Brampton, ON, Canada
Daniel Press, OD, FCOVD Fair Lawn, NJ
Patrick Quaid, OD, FCOVD Guelph, ON, Canada
Steven Ritter, OD, FCOVD New York, NY
Charles Shidlofsky, OD, FCOVD Plano, TX
Sun Hoy Shin, OD, PhD, FCOVD-A Yangsen, South Korea
Audra Steiner, OD, FCOVD New York, NY
Lindsey Stull, OD, FCOVD Saint Joseph, MI
Selwyn Super, OD, FCOVD-A Los Angeles, CA
Kimberly Walker, OD, FCOVD Pomona, CA
Heidi Wise, OD, FCOVD Lincoln, NE
R. Blair Woodard, OD, FCOVD Carrboro, NC
Amanda Zeller, OD, FCOVD Chevy Chase, MD
Deborah Zelinsky, OD, FCOVD Northbrook, IL
(reinstated)

The following therapists have been certified as optometric vision therapists as well. Again...congratulations to all. Please note that the therapists' name is first than her doctors' name. DM

Jennifer Bailey          Daniel Hock, OD, FCOVD
Rachel Bailey          Briana Larson, OD, FCOVD
Angela Barnes          Kelly De Simone, OD, FCOVD
Mindy Benson          Beth Triebel, OD, FCOVD
Tabitha Castleberry          Susan Jong, OD, FCOVD
Ashley Coley          Briana Larson, OD, FCOVD
Karen Danoski          Gary Williams, OD, FCOVD
Gina Gonzales          Penelope S. Suter, OD, FCOVD
Katharina Gutcher          Penelope S. Suter, OD, FCOVD
Julie Hagstrom          Kathleen Buffington, OD, FCOVD
Matt Hillier          Mehrnaz Green, OD, FCOVD
Judy Hielscher          Nancy Torgerson, OD, FCOVD
Karen Hoffman          Camilla Dukes, OD, FCOVD
Elizabeth Stiles Houlihan          Penelope S. Suter, OD, FCOVD
Ivette Huerta          Gary Etting, OD, FCOVD
Paul Janiuk          Donald J. Janiuk, OD, FCOVD
Jose C. Martinez          Ann Voss, OD, FCOVD
Linsey Mead          Jennifer Sortor, OD, FCOVD
Kimberly Miers          Lori Mawbray, OD, FCOVD
Heather Mironas          Ron Bateman, OD, FCOVD
Lina Nakashima          Albert Chun, OD, FCOVD
Sarah Olivier          Susan Jong, OD, FCOVD
Jennifer Rea          Nancy Torgerson, OD, FCOVD
Teresa D. Richards          Penelope S. Suter, OD, FCOVD
Katie Schank          Lori Mawbray, OD, FCOVD
Dinah Siatu’u          Camilla Dukes, OD, FCOVD
Mary Ellen Smith          Rick Graebe, OD, FCOVD
Shari L. Stamps          Penelope S. Suter, OD, FCOVD
Natali Sutermeister          Carole R. Burns, OD, FCOVD
Joseph Wakeland          Ann W. Voss, OD, FCOVD
Daniel Wilson          Mary McMains, OD, FCOVD
Julie Yim          Shelley Kim, OD, FCOVD

American Conference on Pediatric Cerebrl Visual Impairment

 Just a reminder that the American Conference on Pediatric Cerebral Visual Impairment will be held this coming April. Look for more information concerning this conference in January 2012!


The Next Step in the 3D Senario: ZScape 3D holographic prints take maps to the next dimension, sans spectacles

ZScape 3D holographic prints take maps to the next dimension, sans spectacles

This could well be the very next step in the 3D story. Click on the link above to learn more. DM


 

Camita

In the interest of full disclosure I was approached by the Camtica screen recorder software company to promote their product on this blog.Although I do not usually do this, I did need a good screen recording software program so I thought I would give this a try and if it was a decent program I would tell you about it.

I have downloaded and used a trial version of this software and....it actually works pretty well and pretty much as advertised. It is a simple, no bells and whistles program. I did notice that the video appeared somewhat choppy....which could be my camera.... otherwise it seemed to work as advertised....

They did promise me a free copy of the software program to do this.You can download a limited free copy to try it out or it will cost you about $10.00 for the full version.... which appears to be a reasonable price. ... for the full program...

If you need a software program:

* To create professional screen recordings, demonstrations, presentations, screencasts, tutorials and more
* To generate effective videos that help you train, teach, and make sure your patients know how to use those low vision aids
* To create demonstration videos for any vision therapy software program
* To show patients how to insert and take care of contact lenses
* To create on-demand interactive training, tutorials for vision therapy procedures
* To create a set of videos answering your most frequently asked questions
* To share your recordings on YouTube, Screencast.com and other videos sites

...this this may be just for you.

I plan to use this for my lectures (to put them on YouTube) and for other patient information and student teaching videos as well. Try it out. Let me know what you think. DM

Babies Remember Even As They Seem To Forget

Babies Remember Even As They Seem To Forget

......for young babies, out of sight doesn't automatically mean out of mind. But how much do babies remember about the world around them, and what details do their brains need to absorb in order to help them keep track of those things?.....a  study reveals that even though very young babies can't remember the details of an object that they were shown and which then was hidden, the infants' brains have a set of built in "pointers" that help them retain a notion that something they saw remains in existence even when they can't see it anymore......

Thursday, December 29, 2011

Have Your Childrens' Eyes Examined Today!


 


Good Vision Throughout Life


 


Infant Vision: Birth to 24 Months of Age

Learn more about Infant Vision

Preschool Vision: 2 to 5 Years of Age

Learn more about Preschool Vision

 

School-aged Vision (6 to 18 years of age)

Learn more about School-aged Vision

Adult Vision (19 to 40 years of age)

Learn more about Adult Vision (19 to 40 years of age)



Adult Vision (41 to 60 years of age)

Learn more about Adult Vision (41 to 60 years)


Adult Vision (Over 60 years of age)

Learn more about Adult Vision (Over 60 Years of Age)

 

LASIK as an alternative line to treat noncompliant esotropic children


LASIK as an alternative line to treat noncompliant esotropic children

.....LASIK appears to be effective and relatively safe to treat accommodative esotropic children by reducing their hyperopic refractive error, however, patient selection is critical. Larger studies with longer follow-up are necessary to determine its long-term effects....

Comments: LASIK alters corneal structure significantly. As we age the cornea naturally thins....if you burn off corneal tissue in children....what will happen to their corneas when they become seniors? Will they tear because it is now so thin? We don't know. Will you take the risk? DM

Pterygium and Amblyopeia

Fixation and its role in the causation, laterality and location of pterygium: a study in amblyopes and non-amblyopes

..... Patients with suppression had a unilateral pterygium in the better (fixating) eye, whereas those with ARC had bilateral pterygia. Among the controls, 61.9% eyes had bilateral pterygia and 38.1% eyes had unilateral pterygium. In controls, the dominant eye had a higher prevalence of pterygium. All patients in both groups had a nasal pterygium. Pterygium and fixation were strongly associated ......Fixation appears to have an important role in causing pterygium and determining its location and laterality.....



Wednesday, December 28, 2011

The 10 biggest ed-tech stories of 2011

Research bolsters the case for 3D learning.
Two years ago, the first projectors and glasses for delivering stereoscopic 3D images in the classroom emerged, and last year saw a sharp rise in the amount of 3D content available for schools. This year, 3D learning took another huge step forward with a pair of new developments.
In June, Colorado’s Boulder Valley School District (BVSD), an early adopter of 3D technology, released the results of a pilot project showing that the use of 3D content helped increase student engagement and led to better achievement in some cases—with the lowest-performing students seeing the greatest benefits. A few weeks later, the American Optometric Association issued a public health report saying the use of 3D images in school can help diagnose vision problems among students at an earlier age and can enhance teaching and learning.
AOA President Dori Carlson said using 3D images in the classroom can help in two ways: First, children often learn faster and retain more information in a 3D environment; and second, the ability to perceive depth in a 3D presentation turns out to be a highly sensitive assessment tool, able to assess a range of vision health indicators with much higher sensitivity than the standard eye chart that has been in use for the last 150 years.
“For the estimated one in four children who have underlying issues with overall vision, 3D viewing can unmask previously undiagnosed deficiencies and help identify and even treat these problems,” says Carlson. “This is because 3D viewing requires that both eyes function in a coordinated manner as they converge, focus, and track the 3D image.”.......

Comment: To read the whole story click on the title above. DM

Risk factors for retinal detachment following cataract surgery

Risk factors for retinal detachment following cataract surgery

....Younger age, high myopia, and male sex continue to be associated with higher risk of pseudophakic retinal detachment. Intraoperative complications such as PCR also increase the retinal detachment risk. Given the high volume of cataract surgeries performed each year, pseudophakic retinal detachment contributes significantly to visual morbidity in the United States and Europe.....

Monday, December 26, 2011

AOATV is Here!


Attention Therapists: Positive Intervention


Free Physical Activity/Nutrition Program Leader Trainings for Community Agencies Serving People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Free Physical Activity/Nutrition Program Leader Trainings for
Community Agencies Serving People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

The Illinois Department of Public Health’s Disability and Health Program and the University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Disability and Human Development are collaborating to offer a FREE one-day leader training workshop to agencies and organizations that provide services to people with intellectual (ID) and developmental (DD) disabilities.  The workshop will be held in March 2012 and provide staff the tools to help individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities learn how to make healthy physical activity and nutrition choices.   The training, including training materials, will be paid for through a grant from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.  Travel and meals are NOT provided. 

Please let us know by January 11 if your agency or organization would be interested in participating.  Your response won’t be considered as commitment, but rather will be used to plan the location for the training.

1.         My agency could send staff  to a training in following locations: (Please check all that applies)
            _______Springfield    _______Bloomington       _______Chicago area      _______Southern Illinois
_______  Other (please specify) _________________________________.
2.         How many staff would be attending from your agency?  _________
3.         Which program are you most interested in? 
______ National Center on Physical Activity and Disability’s “14-Weeks to a Healthier You” program (program description below)
______ HealthMatters Program (program description below)
______ I would be interested in participating in either program. 
4.         ______ I am not interested at this time, but would be interested in a training at a later date. 

Name:  _______________________________  Title:  ____________________________________
Name of Agency _________________________________________________________________
Address:  _______________________________________________________________________
City:  ______________________________, IL                      ZIP Code:  ______________________
Phone:  __________________________________  Fax:  _________________________________
E-mail:  _________________________________________________________________________
Please return this form to Carla Cox, Illinois Disability and Health Program Manager, by January 11.  FAX:  217-782-1235  or  E-mail:  Carla.Cox@illinois.gov.

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions!  Thanks!
Carla Cox, MPH, CHES Program Manager, Disability and Health
Illinois Department of Public Health 217-557-2939

Dr. Ciuffreda Interview on Optometry/Binocular Vision

 My friend, colleague, and past Dr. & Mrs. Dominick M. Maino Visiting Professor to the Illinois College of Optometry, was recently interviewed by Optometrystudents.com. Ken is a most remarkable individual...he also just co-wrote a chapter with Dr. Neera Kapoor on Traumatic Brain Injury for a new book I edited (along with Drs. Marc Taub and Mary Bartuccio) on patients with special needs. I want to congratulate Ken on being recognized for all of his outstanding accomplishments! DM



Full Article Here - http://optometrystudents.com/video-interview-dr-ciuffreda/

www.Optomterystudents.com recently had the pleasure to speak to one of the world's experts in binocular vision, Dr. Kenneth Ciuffreda. Dr. Ciuffreda has spent ample time researching and working with patients with various complex visual dysfunctions, and has contributed many studies providing proper analysis and treatment for these patients including individuals with mild traumatic brain injury.

Friday, December 23, 2011

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from the Illinois College of Optometruy

Dr. Arol Augsburger, President of the Illinois College of Optometry (ICO), recently sent these holiday greetings to many of us connected to the ICO. It truly represents what ICO and all of us who are a part of this organization believe to be important:

1.) Generosity in mind and heart
2.) Warmth and caring in the performance of all we do
3.) A deep concern for the welfare for those we serve
4.) and a never ending, strongly held belief in our mission statement to provide

              Excellence in Optometric Clinical Education

        I will also add my most heartfelt and joyous voice to the chorus wishing all a very

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!





Thursday, December 22, 2011

iPad Apps for AAC and Visual Strategies

Assistive Technology Unit (ATU)
Department of Disability and Human Development (DHD)
University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)

announces 2 Seminars  for January 2012...


Early Registration Deadline is January 4, 2012
*******************************************************************************************************

iPad Apps for AAC and Visual Strategies


January 16, 2011           9:00am-2:30pm

This seminar provides a brief demonstration and overview of more than 25 apps for augmentative communication and visual supports.  In addition information is provided about how to modify iPads for use as AAC systems.  This seminar is designed for speech/language pathologists, occupational therapists, special educators and assistive technology specialists.Fees and Registration:    Register by January 4, 2012 for the early-bird rate of $100 per person or $90 per person for a group rate of three or more attendees from the same location. After January 4, 2012 the rate is $120 per person.  Space is limited for this course so please register early!

Payment will be accepted with credit card or check made payable to the “UIC Assistive Technology Unit” 
For more information on this seminar and enrollment:
visit http://www.idhd.org/ATUTrainings/aac1-16/index.htm
*******************************************************************************************************

AAC Assessment & Customizing 
iPad/iPods for Communication: 
Hands-on Training with Three AAC Apps  
January 18, 2012  
9:00-3:30

This seminar is designed for individuals involved in the identification, set up and training of AAC systems. The consideration of iPads/iPods in AAC Assessment will be discussed as well as strategies for app selection. Further, t
he afternoon session provides three one-hour break-out sessions for hands on training of three AAC apps: Proloquo2go, TouchChat and SonoFlex.  These sessions will include discussion on how to customize specific apps and AAC systems to meet individualized needs determined through assessment. All participants will have the opportunity to attend each break out session. Some 
iPads will be available for shared use (3 people to a station) during the hands-on training sessions.  Participants are also encouraged to bring their own iPads/iPods with Proloquo2go, TouchChat and/or SonoFlex/ SonoFlex Lite (SonoFlex Lite is a free app).  
Fees and Registration:    Register by January 4, 2012 for the early-bird rate of $130 per person or $120 per person for a group rate of three or more attendees from the same location. After January 4, 2012 the rate is $150 per person.  Space is limited for this course so please register early!

Payment will be accepted with credit card or check made payable to the “UIC Assistive Technology Unit” 
For more information on this seminar and enrollment,

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

2011 Easy-On-the-Eyes Holiday Gift List


The 2011 Easy-On-The-Eyes Holiday Gift List


Concern about the impact of video games on visual health has led The Vision Therapy Center to create its 2011 Easy-On-the-Eyes Holiday Gift List.  It contains 65 gift ideas that can help kids avoid vision problems, including computer eye strain.
The list consists of toys and games that promote visual skills such as hand-eye coordination, visualization, and space perception.  “We created the list because so many children are spending too much time on video games and small electronic screens,” said Dr. Kellye Knueppel, developmental optometrist and owner of The Vision Therapy Center.  Click here to see the list.

Updated info:iPad Apps for AAC and Visual Strategies

Assistive Technology Unit (ATU)
Department of Disability and Human Development (DHD)
University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)

announces 2 Seminars  for January 2012...

Early Registration Deadline is January 4, 2012
******************************************************************

iPad Apps for AAC and Visual Strategies

January 16, 2012          9:00am-2:30pm

This seminar provides a brief demonstration and overview of more than 25 apps for augmentative communication and visual supports.  In addition information is provided about how to modify iPads for use as AAC systems.  This seminar is designed for speech/language pathologists, occupational therapists, special educators and assistive technology specialists.
Fees and Registration:    Register by January 4, 2012 for the early-bird rate of $100 per person or $90 per person for a group rate of three or more attendees from the same location. After January 4, 2012 the rate is $120 per person.  Space is limited for this course so please register early!

Payment will be accepted with credit card or check made payable to the “UIC Assistive Technology Unit” 
For more information on this seminar and enrollment:
visit http://www.idhd.org/ATUTrainings/aac1-16/index.htm

******************************************************************

AAC Assessment & Customizing 
iPad/iPods for Communication: 
Hands-on Training with Three AAC Apps  
January 18, 2012  
9:00-3:30

This seminar is designed for individuals involved in the identification, set up and training of AAC systems. The morning session will focus on AAC Assessment and will include
will be discussed as well as strategies for selecting apps for augmentative communication. T
he afternoon session provides three one-hour break-out sessions for hands on training of three AAC apps: Proloquo2go, TouchChat and SonoFlex.  

These sessions will include discussion on how to customize specific apps and AAC systems to meet individualized needs determined through assessment. All participants will have the opportunity to attend each break out session. Some 
iPads will be available for shared use (3 people to a station) during the hands-on training sessions.  Participants are also encouraged to bring their own iPads/iPods with Proloquo2go, TouchChat and/or SonoFlex/ SonoFlex Lite (SonoFlex Lite is a free app).  

Fees and Registration:    Register by January 4, 2012 for the early-bird rate of $130 per person or $120 per person for a group rate of three or more attendees from the same location. After January 4, 2012 the rate is $150 per person.  Space is limited for this course so please register early!
Payment will be accepted with credit card or check made payable to the “UIC Assistive Technology Unit” 
For more information on this seminar and enrollment,

Monday, December 19, 2011

Sunday, December 18, 2011

Concussion in Sports

Heads Up Concussions in Football

Heads Up Concussion in high school sports. The Illinois Eye Institute is a part of the Chicago Concussion Coalition which wants to educate all involved in sports about how to minimize your concussion risk. For more information about concussion and sports click on the button to the left. For more information about the Illinois Eye Institute and the Chicago Concussion Coalition ...just click on the highlighted links.

Have questions about concussion and traumatic brain injury and the vision problems they can cause? Feel free to ask me. DM


Friday, December 16, 2011

Email Secretary Sebelious Today on this Important Issue

I just sent this email to Secretary Sebelius...won't you do so as well? You can contact her at externalaffairs@hhs.gov ...

Dear Secretary Sebelius:

As a Professor of Pediatrics/Binocular Vision at the Illinois Eye Institute/Illinois College of Optometry, every day I see children who suffer from serious eye health problems (such as amblyopia) because they have not been the beneficiary of appropriate eye and vision care. Please make sure that a pediatric vision care health benefit is based on a solid foundation of direct access to and coverage for an annual comprehensive eye and vision examination, appropriate follow-up care and treatment provided by an eye doctor . There should be no barriers created to restrict access to eye care, especially since up to 1 out of every four school-aged children suffer from a vision problem that could have been effectively treated if properly diagnosed.

I am very active in helping various organizations get the word out about the eye health problems associated with 3D movies, 3D in the home and 3D in the classroom. As part of a team put together by the American Optometric Association, we created a public health document,that clearly shows the importance of single, clear, binocular (two-eyed), pathology free vision in order to appreciate 3D. As simulated 3D educational tools become routinely used in the classroom, we must make sure our students do not have eye health problems that interfere with their educational success.


As you know from your recent meeting with Dr. Dori Carlson, President of the American Optometric Association (AOA), the 2011 School Readiness Summit, which included experts from the U.S. Department of Education and leading national children's health and education groups looked at the failing system of vision screening that leaves millions of children and families to deal with learning difficulties and other serious developmental consequences of undiagnosed and untreated vision problems.


The School Readiness Summit issued a joint statement http://www.aoa.org/documents/Joint_Statement.pdf, signed by more than 30 leading organizations representing doctors, nurses, teachers and parents as well as large employers, supporting "comprehensive eye exams as a foundation for a coordinated and improved approach to addressing children's vision and eye health issues and as a key element of ensuring school readiness in American children."


Please take a moment out of you busy schedule to look at 3D in the Classroom: See Well, Learn Well and the research on how absolutely inadequate vision screenings are at detecting the eye and vision problems that affect our youth.


For 3D in the Classroom: See Well, Learn Well please click here.


For information on how inadequate vision screenings are, please click here.


Access to quality eye health care is essential to overall good health, excellent daily living skills, and academic performance. I urge you to continue to work with the AOA to ensure that the pediatric vision care essential benefit provides for direct access to comprehensive eye exams and follow-up care our children require. Thank you for all your efforts that will make sure our children have the visual abilities they need to do well not only in school, but in life.


Sincerely,


Dominick M. Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD-A
Professor of Pediatrics/Binocular Vision
Distinguished Practitioner, National Academies of Practice
Leonardo da Vinci Award of Excellence in Medicine, Recipient
Professor, Pediatrics/Binocluar Vision Illinois Eye Institute/Illinois College of Optometry
3241 S. Michigan Ave. Chicago, Il. 60616 312-949-7280 (Phone) 312-949-7358 (Fax)  dmaino@ico.edu (Email)
Blog http://www.MainosMemos.blogspot.com

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Special Article: Oculo-Visual Problems of Patients with Special Needs

Special Article: Oculo-Visual Problems of Patients with Special Needs

Individuals with special needs often have numerous undiagnosed and untreated oculo-visual problems. The World Health Organization has noted that the number one cause of treatable visual impairment in the world is uncorrected refractive error (nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism and presbyopia) (see side bar). This is also true for those with developmental, physical, genetically induced and psychiatric disability, as well as those with acquired and traumatic brain injury. This paper briefly reviews the frequently encounter disabilities and their associated oculo-visual problems.....

 Comments: I wrote this article for the therapists who frequent this very good website.Click on the link above to read all of the article. 

Watch for this book to coming sometime in 2012! DM

Monday, December 12, 2011

AAC Assessment & Customizing iPad/iPods for Communication: Hands-on Training with Three AAC Apps

AAC Assessment & Customizing iPad/iPods for Communication: Hands-on Training
with Three AAC Apps

January 18, 2012      9:00-3:30

This seminar is designed for individuals involved in the identification, set up and training of AAC systems. The consideration of iPads/iPods in AAC Assessment will be discussed as well as strategies for app selection. Further, the afternoon session provides three one-hour break-out sessions for hands on training of three AAC apps: Proloquo2go, TouchChat and SonoFlex. These sessions will include discussion on how to customize specific apps and AAC systems to meet individualized needs determined through assessment. All participants will have the opportunity to attend each break out session. Some iPads will be available for shared use (3 people to a station) during the hands-on training sessions. Participants are also encouraged to bring their own iPads/iPods with Proloquo2go, TouchChat and/or SonoFlex/ SonoFlex Lite (SonoFlex Lite is a free app).

Fees and Registration: Register by January 4, 2012 for the early-bird rate of $130 per person or $120 per person for a group rate of three or more attendees from the same location. After January 4, 2012 the rate is $150 per person. Space is limited for this course so please register early!

Payment will be accepted with credit card or check made payable to the “UIC Assistive Technology Unit”

For more information on this seminar and enrollment, visit http://www.idhd.org/ATUTrainings/aac1-18/index.htm

Saturday, December 10, 2011

NIH-FUNDED STUDY FINDS DYSLEXIA NOT TIED TO IQ

NIH-FUNDED STUDY FINDS DYSLEXIA NOT TIED TO IQ

Research on brain activity fails to support widely used approach to identify dyslexic students

Regardless of high or low overall scores on an IQ test, children with dyslexia show similar patterns of brain activity, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The results call into question the discrepancy model-the practice of classifying a child as dyslexic on the basis of a lag between reading ability and overall IQ scores.

In many school systems, the discrepancy model is the criterion for determining whether a child will be provided with specialized reading instruction.  With the discrepancy model, children with dyslexia and lower-than-average IQ scores may not be classified as learning disabled and so may not be eligible for special educational services to help them learn to read.

"The study results indicate that the discrepancy model is not a valid basis for allocating special educational services in reading," said Brett Miller, Ph.D., director of the Reading, Writing and Related Learning Disabilities Program at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the part of the National Institutes of Health that funded the study.  "It follows that, whether they have high IQ scores or low IQ scores, children with great difficulty in learning to read stand to benefit from educational services to help them learn to read."

The study findings were published online in Psychological Science.  The study was conducted by Fumiko Hoeft, M.D., Ph.D., of Stanford University, in Stanford, Calif., and colleagues at Boston College; York University, in Toronto; and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in Cambridge.

Originally, the U.S. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act required the use of the discrepancy model to identify those students who needed assistance for a learning disability.  In the 1990s, studies showed that children who had difficulty learning to read had difficulty with phonological awareness(http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/PRF-teachers-k-3.cfm#phonemic)- matching printed letters of the alphabet to the speech sounds that those letters represented.  Based on these findings, the reauthorization of the Act dropped the requirement that school systems use the discrepancy model.  Many school systems, however, retained the discrepancy model as a means to classify students needing special educational services in reading.

The current study showed that, when they engaged in tasks involving phonological awareness, children with dyslexia showed the same patterns of brain activation, regardless of whether or not they had high or low IQ scores in relation to their reading abilities.

To conduct the study, the researchers measured the brain activity of 131 typical and poor readers from schools in the greater Pittsburgh and San Francisco Bay areas, using functional magnetic resonance imaging scanners.  The students were from 7 to 16 years old.  Based on IQ testing, the students were classified into three groups:

-- Typical readers, having typical reading and IQ scores.
-- Discrepant poor readers (having poor reading scores and typical IQ scores).
-- Poor readers with low IQ scores.

The researchers imaged the children's brain activity as the students looked at pairs of words on a computer screen and indicated whether they rhymed (bate and gait) or did not rhyme (price and miss).

After comparing scans from the three groups, the researchers found no basis for distinguishing between groups of poor readers based on their IQ scores.

"These findings suggest there is little reason to rely on the discrepancy model in the classroom any longer," said Dr. Hoeft.  "Regardless of IQ, all children with dyslexia should be eligible for support in learning to read." 


Comments: It has been shown that many with reading problems have functional vision problems. Isn't it time to make sure all those with LD have visual systems that work they way they should to maximize learning? Take a look at Research update on Visually-Based Reading Disability DM

Surgical correction of permanent exotropia outcomes in amblyopic and non-amblyopic patients

Surgical correction of permanent exotropia outcomes in amblyopic and non-amblyopic patients

PORTES, Adriana Valim et al. Surgical correction of permanent exotropia outcomes in amblyopic and non-amblyopic patients. Arq. Bras. Oftalmol. [online]. 2011, vol.74, n.4, pp. 267-270. ISSN 0004-2749. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0004-27492011000400008.

This retrospective study of 37 clinical records that compared the surgical outcome of exotropia in amblyopic and non-amblyopic patients. The postoperative deviation was assessed at one month and after six months. They ages were for the amblyopes 24.7 ± 14.2 years and non-amblyopes 22.6 ± 18.6 years. The failure rate (please note that I am using term failure rates here instead of the phrase success rates as used in the abstracts) in the immediate postoperative period was 40%  for those with amblyopia) and 0%  for those without amblyopia (success was not defined in the abstract) and approximately 20% for the amblyopic group 6 months later.

Although this is a free, open access paper, since only the abstract was written in English (the paper is in Portuguese), many of my questions could not be answered (like what was their definition of success/failure).

In any case, why would you opt to have surgery with a 40% failure rate? Why do 3rd party payers pay for a surgical intervention with such high failure rates?

As I always state when I am reporting on research dealing with strabismus surgery, I have and will continue to refer patients to have strabismus surgery when appropriate, but I usually recommend that the patient have pre and post surgical intervention vision therapy.

We need clinical trials that show the benefit of having the patient participate in a program of optometric vision therapy both before and after surgical intervention....and that when this occurs the surgery success rates actually increase. DM

Friday, December 9, 2011

iBAM 2011 Irish Books Art and Music

I had an opportunity to be the photographer for this fine event at the Irish American Heritage Center recently. I was just asked to be a staff photographer for IAN (the Irish American News) as well! I told all at the iBAM event that I am Italian by blood and Irish by friendship!! Enjoy. DM


Thursday, December 8, 2011

InfantSee in the News

3D Movies and Your Vision

I don't know how I missed this one...but my friend, colleague and fellow Illinois College of Optometry graduate, Robert P. Rutstein, OD., MS;  is featured. Bob is a professor at the optometry program at the Univeristy of Alabama.

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Disability across the Life Course

I just received this announcement and thought you might be interested in obtaining this new text:

The recently published book "Disability across the Life Course" by Tamar Heller and Sarah Parker Harris, from the Institute on Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), explores topics central to the lives of people with disabilities across the life course. It is part of The SAGE Reference Series on Disability, edited by Gary Albrecht,(UIC). In this book, the life course approach assumes that, beginning prenatally, events occurring early in life affect later periods in one's life. It recognizes that development does not necessarily proceed in neat stages and that impairments interact with social determinants (e.g., culture and socioeconomic status) and environmental aspects (e.g., services and supports) across the life course, resulting in differing outcomes for people. The disability studies approach adds to a life course perspective by bringing in the concepts of disability identity, societal attitudes, the lived experience of people with disabilities and the social and political contexts affecting their lives. In addition to providing an overall theoretical and historical background, this book addresses disability across the life course through delineation of various age phases from pre-natal periods to death. Cross-cutting issues highlighted are: family; health; policy, legislation, and service; and self-determination and participation.


The following is a link to the book: http://www.amazon.com/Disability-Through-Life-Course-Reference/dp/1412987679




Messiah by Handel: The Complete Work

This concert is going to be incredible!                    The                   Apollo Chorus    is an awesome group of men and women dedicated to the very best choral music. This concert is on Sat Dec 10th and Sunday the 18th). Click on the link above to learn more.



Tuesday, December 6, 2011

The Top Ten Most Cited Articles in Optometry

The Top 10 Cited articles published in Optometry, Journal of the American Optometic Association in the last five years include:

Ciuffreda, K.J. Kapoor, N. Rutner, D. Suchoff, I.B. Han, M.E. Craig, S. Occurrence of oculomotor dysfunctions in acquired brain injury: A retrospective analysis Optometry, Volume 78, Issue 4, 2007, Pages 155-161


Andrasko, G.  Ryen, K. Corneal staining and comfort observed with traditional and silicone hydrogel lenses and multipurpose solution combinations Optometry, Volume 79, Issue 8, 2008, Pages 444-454


Jiang, B.Tea, Y.C. O'Donnell, D. Changes in accommodative and vergence responses when viewing through near addition lenses Optometry, Volume 78, Issue 3, 2007, Pages 129-134


Richer, S. Devenport, J. Lang, J.C. LAST II: Differential temporal responses of macular pigment optical density in patients with atrophic age-related macular degeneration to dietary supplementation with xanthophylls Optometry, Volume 78, Issue 5, 2007, Pages 213-219


Shintani, K. Shechtman, D.L. Gurwood, A.S. Review and update: Current treatment trends for patients with retinitis pigmentosa Optometry, Volume 80, Issue 7, 2009, Pages 384-401


Vaughn, W. Maples, W.C. Hoenes, R. The association between vision quality of life and academics as measured by the College of Optometrists in Vision Development Quality of Life questionnaire Optometry, Volume 77, Issue 3, 2006, Pages 116-123


Ciuffreda, K.J. Rutner, D. Kapoor, N. Suchoff, I.B. Craig, S. Han, M.E. Vision therapy for oculomotor dysfunctions in acquired brain injury: A retrospective analysis Optometry, Volume 79, Issue 1, 2008, Pages 18-22


Doughty, M.J. Jonuscheit, S.  An assessment of regional differences in corneal thickness in normal human eyes, using the Orbscan II or ultrasound pachymetry Optometry, Volume 78, Issue 4, 2007, Pages 181-190


Kester, E.M. Charles Bonnet syndrome: Case presentation and literature review Optometry, Volume 80, Issue 7, 2009, Pages 360-366


Sullivan-Mee, M. Halverson, K.D. Saxon, M.C. Saxon, G.B. Qualls, C.Central corneal thickness and normal tension glaucoma: A cross-sectional study Optometry, Volume 77, Issue 3, 2006, Pages 134-140

I congratulate all the authors, the American Optometric Association, Dr. Paul Freemen, Optometry's editor and Optometry's Journal Review Board for consistently producing such an outstanding publication.

As a member of the Journal Review Board, I am somewhat biased, but if the latest citation index findings are any indication, Optometry, is not only moving up in the index, but also is being used by scientific publications as an impoprtant authority in the area of eye care science and clinical practice.

I am also thrilled that my very good friends and colleagues, Drs. Ciuffreda, Kapoor, Suchoff, Gurwood and Richter are the authors/co-authors of these fine papers.

Please note the number of articles emphasizing binocular vision, accommodation, oculomotor ability, optometric vision therapy, brain injury, patients with special needs and quality of life issues....all of which are near and dear to my heart....and should be a sign that optometry's future rests upon our ability to guarentee single, clear, comfortable, pathology-free, binocular vision for all our patients.

If you are an optometrist, read your journal.
If you are an optometrist, write for your journal.
If you are an optometrist, tell others about your journal.

Do it.

DM

How Meditation Benefits The Brain

How Meditation Benefits The Brain

I am reposting this since many of you have asked for the link to the article....I usually add the link...but forgot to do so .... here it is http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/238093.php

Enjoy! DM

.... found that the experienced meditators, regardless of the type of meditation they practised, seemed able to switch off the default mode network, which has been linked to lapses of attention, and disorders such as attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and anxiety. This part of the brain, comprising the medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate cortex, has also been linked to the accumulation of beta amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

They also found that when the default mode network was active in the experienced meditators, other parts of the brain, associated with self-monitoring and cognitive control, were active at the same time. This was not the case with the novices....

Monday, December 5, 2011

Make Christmas Special!


Listen to the  
Sing Handel's Messiah! 

Click the above link to learn more!

How The Brain's Structure And Genes Affect Autism And Fragile X Syndrome

How The Brain's Structure And Genes Affect Autism And Fragile X Syndrome

 ....Research just released shows that scientists are finding new tools to help understand neurodevelopmental disorders like autism and fragile X syndrome. These studies show in new detail how the brain's connections, chemicals, and genes interact to affect behavior. The research findings were presented at Neuroscience 2011, the Society for Neuroscience's annual meeting and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science health.....

 

Saturday, December 3, 2011

Xbox Kinect

Xbox Kinect: can you imagine what awesome things we could do with this in optometric vision therapy?

Toll-like Receptors Play Role In Brain Damage In Newborns

Toll-like Receptors Play Role In Brain Damage In Newborns

.....Roughly two in every thousand babies are at risk of suffering brain damage as a result of events before, during and after delivery. Infections in the blood or a reduced supply of oxygen and blood can lead to inflammation in the brain, causing injury. This type of brain damage, which is much more common in premature babies, can result in neurological problems such as cerebral palsy, learning difficulties and epilepsy.....

Friday, December 2, 2011

Digital Health Summit Consumer Electronics Show 2012

Digital Health Summit at Consumer Electronics Show

The Digital Health Summit at the 2012 Consumer Electronics Show gives you a ringside seat for a look at today’s and tomorrow’s medical care. You’ll hear from innovative change agents in medicine and technology today and see the building blocks of at the forefront of this brave new world. Join us in the life-changing discussions that will impact the future of global healthcare.

Just a few of the Speakers and Moderators:

Gary Strumolo, Global Manager of Health & Wellness Research, Interiors and Infotainment for Ford Research and Innovation, Ford Motor Company
Ira Flatow, Science Correspondent and TV Journalist, Science Friday on NPR
Eric J. Topol, M.D., Director, Scripps Translational Science Institute, Vice-Chair, West Wireless Health Institute, Author, Creative Destruction of Medicine
Reed Tuckson, M.D., Executive Vice President and Chief of  Medical Affairs, UnitedHealth Group
John Sculley, Served as: President of PepsiCo, CEO of Apple, Chairman of Watermark Medical
Daniel Kraft, MD, Founder and Executive Director, Intellimedicine and FutureMed
Don Jones, Vice President of Wireless Health, Global Strategy and Market Development, Qualcomm
Eric Taub, Writer, New York Times ..... and many more!

What You’ll Learn:

Who are the visionaries shaping the future of digital health?
How are gaming and social networking revolutionizing healthcare?
How can your organization can capitalize on this high-growth market?
Diabetes and Obesity: How Can Technology Change the Outcomes?
Is Technology Changing the Doctor-Patient Relationship?
Is Mobile Making Us Healthier?
How the new platforms like automobiles and kitchen appliances will be delivering consumer health solutions?
Who is paying the bill for eHealth?
How will personalized medicine play an essential role in the future of healthcare?


Comments: I spoke at this show last year and it was awesome! DM