Saturday, May 8, 2010

A giant has passed from this world to the next



Dr. John Streff, a name well known to all in optometry and to all who specialize in optometric vision therapy, pediatric vision care, and rehabilitative optometry.

His online office CV notes that:


He was in PRIVATE PRACTICE, VISION THERAPY, REHABILITATIVE OPTOMETRY LANCASTER, OHIO 1989. CONSULTING MEDICAL STAFF, UNIV.CINCINNATI, DRAKE REHABILITATION CENTER, CINCINNATI, OHIO, 1993

EDUCATION: 1944-1945 STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, MINOT, ND 1946-1948 UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, PRE-PROFESSIONAL, MINNEAPLOIS, MN 1951 BS, CHICAGO COLLEGE OF OPTOMETRY, CHICAGO, IL 1951 O.D.,CHICAGO COLLEGE OF OPTOMETRY, CHICAGO, IL 1956 EXTERNSHIP, UNDER ARNOLD GESELL, M.D. & RICHARD APELL, O.D. GESELL INSTITUTE, NEW HAVEN, CT. 1958-66 POST GRADUATION SUMMER SESSIONS, EXPERIMENTAL PSYCH, OHIO STATE UVIVERSITY, COLUMBUS, OHIO

RECOGNITIONS AND AWARDS: GESELL INSTITUTE OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT, MELLON FOUNDATION, 1956 FELLOWSHIP: MISSOURI VALLEY OPTOMETRIC SOCIETY, 1956 MERITORIOUS AWARD: U.S. CONGRESS, INNOVATIVE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM, CHESSHIRE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, CHESHIRE, CT 1971 G.N. GETMAN AWARD, DEVELOPMENT OPTOMETRIST OF THE YEAR IN USA, COVD, 1981 ELECTED AS FELLOW, NATIONAL ACADEMY OF PRACTIONERS, 1984
THE ADVANCEMENT OF NEURO-OPTOMETRIC REBHABILIATION AWARD, 1995 BEST ARTICLE, JOURNAL OF COLLEGE OF OPTOMETRISTS IN VISION DEVELOPMENT, 1995 NEURO OPTOMETRIC REHABILIAATION ASSOC. STREFF MEDAL, YEARLY AWARD RECOGNIZING CONTRIBUTION IN VISUAL REHABILITATION DOCTOR OF OCULAR SCIENCE, HONORARY DEGREE, NEW ENGLAND COLLEGE OF OPTOMETRY, MAY 1997 A.N.SKEFFINGTON AWARD, EXCELLENCE IN OPTOMETRIC WRITING, COVD, 1997.

DR STREFF BELONGED TO MANY ORGANIZATIONS, COMMITTEES, AND CIVICS GROUPS AND HAS OVER 30 PUBLICATIONS.

John was much more than what is noted above. He was an individual made from the same cloth as Skeffinton, Alexander, and Getman. He was an individual who conducted a single subject design research study on each of his patients...because he knew how each individual patient was important and different from all those other patients he had helped over the years.

John is now one of those giants whom shoulders we all stand upon. God Bless him and Keep him in the palm of His hand. DM

Thursday, May 6, 2010

TV Segment Focuses On Dangers Of Costume Contact Lenses.


From AOA First Look:

On its website and on the air, WRAL-TV Raleigh-Durham, NC (5/5, 6:24 p.m., Mask) pointed out the dangers of costume contact lenses. According to optometrist Jill Bryant, OD, "purchasers of colored or costume contact lenses should beware of outlets like gas stations, flea markets, beauty supply stores, and the Internet selling those lenses illegally." After focusing on a 16-year-old Durham youth who now needs a cornea transplant after wearing colored contact lenses bought last year from a beauty supply store, WRAL-TV urged parents whose children have such lenses to "find out where they were purchased and report the information to the FDA or the NC Board of Optometry."

More Americans Delaying "Adulthood"

...Despite living in an age of iPods and hybrid cars, young Americans are more like the young adults of the early 1900s than the baby boom generation: They are living at home longer, are financially insecure and are making lower wages. ...

Comments: I know what they mean!! DM

Blinking Eyes Indicate Mind Wandering

...When your mind wanders, you're not paying attention to what's going in front of you. A new study suggests that it's not just the mind, it's the body, too; when subjects' minds wandered, they blinked more, setting up a tiny physical barrier between themselves and the outside world. ...

Children With Autism Frequently Receive Psychotropic Medications

...Research conducted by Autism Speaks' Autism Treatment Network (ATN) shows that use of psychotropic medications is common among children with ASD, with 27 percent of those enrolled in the network registry receiving at least one medication to manage their behavior. The most common reasons for medication use were hyperactivity, repetitive behaviors, irritability and attentional concerns. ...

Comments: Do we over medicate those with disability? Check out RJ Donati RJ, Maino DM, Bartell H, Kieffer M. Polypharmacy and the Lack of Oculo-Visual Complaints from those with Mental Illness and Dual Diagnosis.Optometry 2009;80:249-254.

BACKGROUND: Individuals with mental illness (MI) and intellectual disability (ID) are characterized as dually diagnosed (DD). These individuals are known to have numerous systemic and oculo-visual anomalies. This comorbidity of conditions should elicit frequent oculo-visual complaints from these patients during the initial review of systems. A search of MedLine yielded one article that was published on oculo-visual symptomology/pain associated with MI and DD. This report appears to be the first to assess the frequency of these symptoms within these 2 unique populations. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of all medical records for patients (N = 202) evaluated at the Neumann Association (NA) Developmental Disabilities Service of the Illinois Eye Institute was completed. Only the records of patients who had either MI or DD and who were prescribed antipsychotics, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, or tranquilizers/anxiolytics were used for our analysis. Upon record review, 89.9% of MI and 59.4% of DD individuals met the above subject criteria. We determined the frequency of ocular anomalies, drugs taken, and complaints reported by patients during the initial review of systems. RESULTS: The most common documented side effects for the targeted drug types were decreased or blurred vision (near or far), visual hallucinations, decreased accommodation, and eyelid/conjunctiva irregularities. In our sample, the most frequent ocular anomalies encountered were astigmatism (50% MI and 37.84% DD), myopia (60.71% MI and 62.16% DD), presbyopia (35.71% MI and 37.84%DD), and blepharitis (32.14% MI and 32.43%DD). Additionally, the most frequently encountered complaints were no complaints (45.16% MI and 46.84% DD), blurry vision (17.74% MI and 17.72% DD), and need new glasses (11.29% MI and 17.72% DD). CONCLUSIONS: It has been established that MI and DD populations exhibit a higher incidence of oculo-visual anomalies (uncorrected refractive error, binocular vision anomalies, ocular pathology) than noted in the general population. They are also typically taking 1 or more neuropsychotropic medications that are frequently associated with undesirable visual side effects. Individuals with MI and DD should report numerous complaints associated with the medications they take and the oculo-visual anomalies they exhibit during the initial case history and the review of systems. The data from this study suggest that this is not the case and that only about 50% of those who should have complaints actually report them.

DM

This one is just for FUN!!

8 Ways to Prevent Medication Errors in Kids

...A child with a chronic medical condition, such as sickle cell anemia, cancer, or epilepsy, may require several doses of medication per day—a routine that can be tough to keep up with. So tough, in fact, that a new study, presented Monday at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Vancouver finds that errors in giving medications to children at home are not uncommon. Researchers identified 128 medication errors—such as giving too much or too little of a drug—during visits to the homes of 83 children between December 2007 and September 2009. Seventy three of those errors had the potential to harm the child, while 10 errors actually caused injury....

LA Mom's Blog Rocks!



Los Angeles Mom's blogger Amanda Rudolph Schwartz is a mom and writer. She occassionally has time (when not doing eye exercises) to blog on her own site at www.adviceyoudidnotaskfor.blogspot.com. Recently she discussed the trial and tribulations she encountered while trying to find out information about optometric vision therapy so that she could decide if her child could benefit from this treatment. What follows are some snippets of what she wrote. Please click on the title above to go to her blog and read the whole story. DM

Vision therapy. Ever heard of it? I hadn't until twelve weeks ago when it became yet another piece of my mothering journey.

But first a little history. My husband was diagnosed with dyslexia after years of struggling with reading and writing. ....My mother-in-law remembers doing some sort of eye exercises as a child and still hates to read. I was very aware of these things when my son was born.....My son sees a wonderful and highly-regarded educational therapist semi-regularly ....I also knew in my gut that his eyes were holding him back--not the sole cause of some of his learning difficulties but a piece of the puzzle....Finally, with my son almost 7, we went to an educational opthamologist (did you even know they exist?) for testing
[Comment: I believe she meant behavioral optometrist since ophthalmologists are not trained nor certified in this optometric speciality. DM]. ....One quick Google was all it took to unleash a firestorm of naysayers ...But I decided to trust my own mother inner voice and take my son to the top guy in town. In the waiting room, I met incredible mothers who had driven over 50 miles for their children's weekly sessions. They were all kind, articulate and passionate about this doctor and this therapy.

When it came time for our appointment, I sat in on the one hour testing and was truly amazed. I saw very clearly that my son struggled immensely with tracking words and numbers across a page. ..... I made some calls to people I trust, educators and child advocates to gain more information. Then, I took to the mommy blogs to hear what those in the trenches had to say. And, finally, I used my mommy experience, wisdom and instinct to make my own decision.

Yesterday, my son was tested after completing his first ten
[VT] sessions. On one test, he jumped from the 16th percent to the 75th percent. On another test, he went from the level of a 4 year old to a 7 and 10 year old. The improvements were staggering. ....as mother's day nears, I can't help but think, sometimes moms really do know best!

Wednesday, May 5, 2010

IPhone App to Predict Glaucoma Risks for Patients

After going through the regular hassle of hunting down his risk calculator, Kentucky optometetrist Austin Lifferth, O.D., decided he needed a new way to estimate his patients’ risk factors for glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

Dr. Lifferth contacted software engineer Zachary Smith, and they partnered to create a new iPhone/iTouch “app” called “P.R.E.D.I.C.T” (Patient Risk Estimator Directing Individual Care and Treatment)....


Read more by clicking here. Get the app by clicking the title above. DM

So THIS is Optometry!!



ASCO EnVision 2010 video contest entry presenting a fresh look at the ever-evolving profession of optometry. Written and directed by Marc Schmitt.

COVD Urges Its Members to Join AOA!

The College of Optometrists in Vision Development (COVD) wants its members to become involved in the American Optometric Association (AOA) if you are not already a part of this outstanding organization. By joining with the AOA, you will help to get the word out about binocular vision dysfunction, learning related vision disorders and optometric vision therapy. The AOA has had major campaigns to inform it's members about convergence insufficency and how to diagnose and treat this medical condition and will soon conduct a public service campaign to inform the public about 3 D Vision Syndrome and how AOA and COVD members diagnose and treat the many signs and symptoms of this technologically induced health care concern. DM

Tuesday, May 4, 2010

College of Optometrists in Vision Development members Support InfantSee

COVD members around the country are holding events in May to promote the InfantSEE® program. COVD member, Dr. Nate Bonilla-Warford is holding a Baby Day on May 8, and will be joined by doctors around the country holding similar events. Several California optometrists are holding InfantSEE® week from May 10 through 14.

If you are an InfantSEE® provider, consider holding a special event to help get the word out about the importance of infant vision care. Spreading the word about the InfantSEE® program gives us an opportunity to educate parents not only about critical infant vision care, but also to teach moms about activities that will help their children develop good visual skills early in life that will help to ensure good visual skills necessary for success in school, work and recreation!

If you are not an InfantSEE provider, COVD encourages you to become one. Learn more about the AOA InfantSEE® program.

Monday, May 3, 2010

Recall of Kids' Tylenol, Motrin, Zyrtec, Benadryl

43 Liquid Child/Infant Products Recalled by Johnson and Johnson's McNeil Division

Manufacturing defects have led to the recall of 43 child and infant liquid formulations of Tylenol, Motrin, Zyrtec, and Benadryl by McNeil, a division of Johnson & Johnson.

No injuries or deaths have yet been reported. The voluntary recall follows an April 19 FDA inspection of a McNeil plant in Fort Washington, Pa. that uncovered "manufacturing deficiencies," the Washington Post reports.

The company says the chances of injury from one of the recalled products are "remote." Yet consumers are warned not to use the recalled products.

"Some of the products included in the recall may contain a higher concentration of active ingredient than is specified; others may contain inactive ingredients that may not meet internal testing requirements; and others may contain tiny particles," a company news release states.

If children who have taken the recalled products have unusual symptoms, parents are urged to contact a health care professional.

Parents should not give children adult formulation of the medications. Alternative brands of the products, including generic medications, are available. Parents who have questions about alternative treatments should consult their child's pediatrician.

Recalled products may be returned for a refund or exchanged for a fresh product once manufacturing issues have been resolved.

McNeil did not say how many units were being recalled, but the number likely is huge. Recalled products were distributed in the U.S., Canada, Dominican Republic, Dubai (UAE), Fiji, Guam, Guatemala, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Panama, Trinidad & Tobago, and Kuwait.
List of Recalled Products

For a complete list of the products click on the title above
:

Repeated surgery for acute acquired esotropia: is it worth the effort?

...Our findings support the good binocular potential in patients with acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) type II. Despite a complicated course and long-lasting absence of stereovision, all patients eventually regained highgrade stereopsis. Resolutely aiming at realignment seems to be worth the effort....

Comments: I always find it interesting that our ophthalmology colleagues can get away with "stuff" that they criticize optometry for doing. The authors of this paper call having 4 subjects (the number of patients in the article) a study. Well, as you know this is much more a case series than a study. I am not downgrading a case series paper....I've published them myself...but I know the limitations and I know to limit my conclusions using appropriate cautions. They also call a positive response on the Lang "high grade stereopsis". Not really. This is still a pretty gross level of stereo (Test 1 has disparities of 550, 600, and 1200, with car, star, and cat. Test 2 has Moon 200, car 400, and elephant 600)...on the other hand...it is better than no stereo. The bottom line is that most of these patients had more than one surgery...we neeed to tell our patients what outcomes to expect. We need to tell them that if we do optometric vision therapy before and after strab surgery that the outcomes are usually better (optometrists pay attention to the sensory aspects of being a strab not just motor) and that no matter what treatment option is offered, it will take time and effort. Read the PDF by clicking on the title above.DM