Thursday, October 22, 2009

Researchers Optimizing Progesterone

...As doctors begin to test progesterone for traumatic brain injury at sites across the country, researchers are looking ahead to optimizing the hormone's effectiveness....According to the results, two compounds similar to progesterone showed an equivalent ability to reduce brain swelling in an animal model of traumatic brain injury....

Doctors: Vaccine, not actual flu, best way to give kids immunity

...As health care workers around the country work frantically to accommodate the millions seeking protection against the H1N1 strain of influenza, they have to contend with a countertrend: significant numbers of Americans who don't plan to vaccinate themselves or their children...The reasons given are often that they don't think it's necessary, or that they're uncertain about the safety of the vaccine. But one response, given by 69% of parents in a September poll by Consumer Reports, is different. Those parents say they'd rather have their children build "natural immunity" to the flu — by getting sick....

Comments: You do not build up an immunity to the flu!! DM

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Children's blood lead levels linked to lower test scores

...Exposure to lead in early childhood significantly contributes to lower performances on end-of-grade (EOG) reading tests among minority and low-income children, according to researchers at Duke University and North Carolina Central University.

"We found a clear dose-response pattern between lead exposure and test performance, with the effects becoming more pronounced as you move from children at the high end to the low end of the test-score curve," said lead investigator Marie Lynn Miranda, director of the Children's Environmental Health Initiative (CEHI) at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment....

Experts summarize state of the science in autism disorders

...Scientific understanding and medical treatments for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have advanced significantly over the past several years, but much remains to be done, say experts from the Center for Autism Research at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who published a scientific review of the field today.

"We summarized many new findings by autism researchers throughout the world, and give our perspective on the current state of the science in autism spectrum disorders," said lead author Susan E. Levy, M.D., a developmental pediatrician and medical director of the Regional Autism Center at Children's Hospital. "We hope our review will be a useful reference for healthcare professionals working with ASD patients and families."...

Comments: For additional information on vision problems associated with autism go to Optometry & Vision Development vol 40 #3

Editorials
Partly Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs
by Dominick M. Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD-A, Editor

Serving the Needs of the Patient with Autism
by Rachel A. Coulter, OD, FCOVD, FAAO

Articles
The Role of Optometry in Early Identification of Autism Spectrum Disorders
by Leonard J. Press, OD, FAAO, FCOVD; Jack E. Richman, OD, FAAO, FCOVD

The Etiology of Autism
by Dominick M. Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD-A; Stephen G. Viola, PhD; Robert Donati, PhD

Brain Anatomy, Electrophysiology and Visual Function/Perception in Children within the Autism Spectrum Disorder
by Stephen G. Viola, PhD; Dominick M. Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD-A

Understanding the Visual Symptoms of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
by Rachel A Coulter, OD, FCOVD, FAAO

Insights into the Diagnosis and Treatment of Patients within the Autism Spectrum: A Patient’s Story
by Nancy G. Torgerson, OD, FCOVD

Literature Review
Current Eye & Vision Science Literature
Review by David A. Goss, OD, PhD, FAAO, FCOVD-A

Book Review
Eye Power: A Cutting Edge Report on Vision Therapy
Review by Leonard J. Press, OD, FCOVD, FAAO

Autism Frontiers: Clinical Issues and Innovations
Review by Dominick M. Maino, OD, MEd, FAAO, FCOVD-A

NewsMakers

Why are preemies more likely to develop autism?

....Researchers have long seen signs of autism in children born prematurely, and some studies have suggested that such signs can develop into full-blown autism in childhood. A study out Monday suggests that complications during pregnancy and early life may be responsible for this early risk.

It's unclear just how many children born prematurely will develop autism. The study, in the November issue of Pediatrics, included 1216 children with autistic disorders and 6080 without....

Routine Use Of Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) After Vaccination Not Recommended For Infants

...European researchers conducted two trials and concluded that giving infants drugs containing paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen) to reduce fever after vaccination is likely to be counterproductive since they found evidence that it reduced the body's ability to produce a full immune response to the vaccine....

Comments: Be careful what over the counter (OTC) drugs you and your children use at all times. Just becasue they are OTC doesn't mean they are always safe! DM

FDA To Investigate Quality Of Life Problems Following LASIK Eye Surgery

...The US Food and Drug Administration has launched a collaborative study to investigate the potential impact of Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) eye surgery on patients' quality of life. The project will seek to establish the proportion of LASIK patients in the US who experience significant post-procedure quality of life problems such as blurred vision and dry eyes....

Comments: It's about time! They should add binocular vision problems to that list as well. DM

Dyslexia Varies Across Language Barriers

...Chinese-speaking children with dyslexia have a disorder that is distinctly different, and perhaps more complicated and severe, than that of English speakers. Those differences can be seen in the brain and in the performance of Chinese children on visual and oral language tasks,...

Scientists Locate Literacy In The Brain With The Help Fof Former Colombian Guerrillas

...A unique study of former guerrillas in Colombia has helped scientists redefine their understanding of the key regions of the brain involved in literacy. The study, funded by the Wellcome Trust and the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science, has enabled the researchers to see how brain structure changed after learning to read....

Internet good for the brain

...You can teach an old dog new tricks, say UCLA scientists who found that older adults with little Internet experience were able to trigger key centers in the brain that control decision-making and complex reasoning after just one week of surfing the Web....

CDC: H1N1 Flu Still Hits the Young Hardest

...The pandemic H1N1 influenza virus continues to disproportionately attack the young, the CDC warned today. Children and adults under age 25 have accounted for 53% of hospitalizations for laboratory-confirmed H1N1 and 23.6% of related deaths since Sept. 1, the agency reported at a press briefing....

Comments: I have a 23 y/o daughter and a 26 y/0 son. I have recommended that both of them get their flu shots. The young are at most risk. What will you do? DM

Children with Low Literacy and Poor Stereoacuity: An Evaluation of Complex Interventions in a Community-Based Randomized Trial

...A formal randomized control trial was feasible in this setting. Intervention among children with poor stereoacuity and low literacy produced small improvements in stereopsis and convergence insufficiency symptom scores. Further randomized control trials should be conducted to clarify the role of orthoptic intervention on literacy in selected child populations.....

Comments: What they found was what many of us find dealing with children from lower socio-economic populations. Complete success is harder to achieve. They are probably many reasons for this. DM

Safety of Contact Lenses

One of my readers asked if contact lenses were safe, especially if they have been worn for a long time. I would strongly urge any and all who wear contacts to follow your doctors' advice. If he or she says you are doing well...if you follow what they tell you ... you should do just fine. Most patients problems occur when the patient does not follow the recommendations of the doctor. DM

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

NBC's Zoraida Sambolin Helps Present Award to the Mainos


Zoraida Sambolin is the Weekday Edition co-anchor of NBC5 News Today and special assignment reporter and fill-in news anchor for Telemundo Chicago. She was the host at the recent Heart of St. Bartholomew Galla where Dr. and Mrs. Dominick Maino received the Heart of St. Bartholomew Award for their parish activities.

Monday, October 19, 2009

To All ICO Alumni: You are Invited!

You are cordially invited to attend the Illinois College of Optometry Alumni Reception hosted by ICO President Dr. Arol Augsburger at the AAO in Orlando. The reception will be held at the Orlando World Center Marriott, Friday, November 13th, in the Grand Ballroom 9, from 7:30 - 9:00 p.m.

If you are planning to attend Academy this year, this is a great opportunity for you to enjoy a social event specifically for graduates of your Alma Mater.

Join us for complimentary hors d'oeuvres and beverages during this business-casual gathering. We encourage you to invite your fellow alumni and prospective students to this event as well.

Thanks and hope to see you there!

Connie

Connie M. Scavuzzo, MA

Director of Alumni Development
Illinois College of Optometry
312-949-7080

RESEARCH AND CLINICAL STUDIES ON VISION, LEARNING

AAO BVP Section Info

AAO Section Information

Binocular Vision, Perception & Pediatric Optometry Section News
Section Eventsat Academy 2009 Orlando

Join your Section colleagues at the below events during Academy 2009 Orlando, November 11-14, 2009.

Thursday, November 12, Section Reception, 7:00 pm, Canary 4
Friday, November 13, Section Business Meeting 1:00-2:00 pm, Grand Ballroom 9
Saturday,
November 14, Section Symposium, 10:00 am-12:00 pm, Grand Ballroom 11-12

Exotropia: What do we know? What do we need to know?
Moderator: Rick London
Presenters: Susan Cotter, Bruce Wick, Jeffrey Cooper, Jonathan Holmes
Intermittent exotropia (IXT) can be a perplexing condition for the optometrist to manage. Which treatment modality should you use and when? In this symposium, you will learn differential diagnosis and sequential management, as well as the different treatment options.
Sports Vision 2010 - A New Paradigm

Please visit here for information about a first-of-its-kind, academic-based sports vision conference.

AAO OES News

Section InformationOptometric Education Section News

Optometric Education Section News

Dear OE Section Members,Hold the date and time! The Optometric Education Section will be presenting an educational and exciting symposium with nationally recognized speakers. Make sure you stop in to view and discuss the posters and papers. Additionally, we hope to see you all at the Business Meeting.


The Challenging Student: Common Challenges and the Role of the Faculty
Saturday, November 14, 10:00 AM-12:00 PM
Optometric educators often deal with challenging students. Unfortunately, most educators have little formal training on how to identify mental health and learning disorders and help the challenging student. Learn about common mental health and learning disorders with an emphasis on attention deficit disorder.
Presenters: Myles L. Cooley, Elizabeth P. Heiney, David A. Damari

Optometric Education Section Business MeetingThursday, November 12th, 6-7:30PM, San Francisco Room

See you soon,Lewis Reich OE Section Chair
Aurora Denial OE Program Chair

Children asymptomatic 1 year after cessation of convergence insufficiency therapy

...Children aged 9 to 17 years who were treated for convergence insufficiency showed improvements in symptoms for more than a year after stopping treatment...

Refractive errors in children and young adults with Down's syndrome

...The incidence of refractive errors in Macedonian children and young adults with DS was similar to that in Asian children. Compared with White (Caucasian) and Asian children with DS, Macedonian children and young adults exhibited lower incidences of hypermetropia and myopia, and a higher incidence of astigmatism, in which oblique astigmatism represented the predominant type...

Bedside eye exam outperforms MRI

From AOA First Look:

Researchers using bedside eye exam outperform MRI in identifying stroke.
Medscape (10/16, Gandey) reported that, at a meeting of the American Neurological Association, researchers using a bedside eye exam "showed how they were able to outperform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and flag 100% of strokes." In their "prospective cross-sectional study, investigators examined 101 patients at high risk for acute vesticular syndrome." The researchers "administered 3 tests checking vestibule-ocular-reflex on horizontal head impulse, nystagmus, and ocular alignment during prism cross-cover. All patients underwent neuroimaging." The researchers "only misclassified 1 out of 25 patients who had a vestibular disease that was a benign condition of the inner ear," while "12% of patients who had a stroke identified on a later MRI had an initially false-negative result." in identifying stroke.
Medscape (10/16, Gandey) reported that, at a meeting of the American Neurological Association, researchers using a bedside eye exam "showed how they were able to outperform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and flag 100% of strokes." In their "prospective cross-sectional study, investigators examined 101 patients at high risk for acute vesticular syndrome." The researchers "administered 3 tests checking vestibule-ocular-reflex on horizontal head impulse, nystagmus, and ocular alignment during prism cross-cover. All patients underwent neuroimaging." The researchers "only misclassified 1 out of 25 patients who had a vestibular disease that was a benign condition of the inner ear," while "12% of patients who had a stroke identified on a later MRI had an initially false-negative result."

Parade Magazine Article

Here's the complete article where I was quoted by health care writer Ranit Misohri, MD in Parade Magazine.

Sunday, October 18, 2009

When Are Kids Ready For Contacts?



Ranit Mishori, MD the health writer for Parade Magazine (and several other news sources) was kind enough to interview me for a article in the Sunday October 18th, 2009 magazine. Please click on the title to read the complete article....DM

......“When necessary, children at any age can wear contact lenses,” says Dr. Dominick Maino, a professor of pediatric optometry at the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago. Contact lenses require some work on the part of the patient—keeping them clean, storing them correctly, inserting them gently. So chronological age is less important in making this decision than motivation and maturity.

Girls may be ready at a younger age than boys. Says Dr. Maino: “I usually tell parents that when boys start to notice girls, and when girls can keep their rooms clean, they may be ready for contact lenses.” Some kids are able to use them properly with parental supervision and help.

But Dr. Maino also cautions, “Parents should not push their child to wear contact lenses. It must be the child’s idea. They must be motivated to wear them.”

Contact lenses are not without risks, of course. Kids should not wear them while swimming or in dusty, dirty environments. They should not share them with their friends. For sports and similar activities, they may need to wear protective goggles over their contacts......