Thursday, February 26, 2009

Majority of injuries to young children may be unintentional

From AOA FirstLook:

Majority of injuries to young children may be unintentional, study suggests.
UPI (2/23) reported, "The majority of injuries to US children younger than age 15 are not the result of physical abuse, but unintentional injuries," according to a study published in the Journal of Emergency Medicine. The study included "50,000 Missouri children up to age four with at least one injury-related emergency room visit in 2000." Researchers found that "young children with multiple injury-related emergency-room visits are more likely than children with only one visit to have been reported to Child Protective Services." Meanwhile, "the risk of having a Child Protective Services report increased from two-fold for children with two emergency department visits to five-fold for children with four or more visits."

Headaches After Brain Injury Common Among Returning Vets

...Soldiers who had mild head trauma while serving in Iraq or Afghanistan are returning to the U.S. with a high prevalence of headache,..... Nearly 98% of soldiers who'd had a concussion, head injury, or blast exposure on duty reported having headaches,....

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/139629.php

...Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered that early visual areas, long believed to play no role in higher cognitive functions such as memory, retain information previously hidden from brain studies. The researchers made the discovery using a new technique for decoding data from functional magnetic resonance imaging or fMRI. The findings are a significant step forward in understanding how we perceive, process and remember visual information....

Study Indicates How We Maintain Visual Details In Short Term Memory

...Working memory (also known as short term memory) is our ability to keep a small amount of information active in our mind. This is useful for information we need to know on-the-fly, such as a phone number or the few items we need to pick up from the grocery store. We hang on to the information for a brief period of time, just long enough to make a phone call or get through the checkout line, and then we forget it forever. We receive much of our information through our visual system, but it was unknown how much of this visual information is actively involved in short term memory...

Child Abuse Causes Lifelong Changes To DNA Expression And Brain

...A study led by researchers in Canada who analysed post mortem brain samples of suicide victims with a history of being abused in childhood found changes in DNA expression that were not present in suicide victims with no childhood abuse history or in people who died of other causes. The affected DNA was in a gene that regulates the way the brain controls the stress response....

Results Reported For The Study Of Fluoxetine In Autism (SOFIA) Announced By Autism Speaks

Autism Speaks has announced initial results reported for the first industry-sponsored trial of the Autism Clinical Trials Network (ACTN), the Study of Fluoxetine in Autism (SOFIA). These results showed that fluoxetine was not effective for reducing repetitive behaviors in children and adolescents with Autistic Disorder as compared to placebo (non-medicinal sugar pill). ...

BV Problems in School Aged Children...

Comments: This was from the Developmental Optometric Community Email List, Dr. Mary McMains. I reposting it here....because even WE forget how many children have binocular vision dysfunctions. DM

The Highest Prevalence of Vision Problems in School Age Children
23% Hyperopia (farsightedness of +1.50D or greater)
22.5% Astigmatism (-1.00D or greater)
19.6% Myopia (nearsightedness -0.50D or greater)
16.3% General Binocular Disorders (eye teaming problems)
10.7% Strabismus (eye turns)
6.8% Amblyopia (functional loss of vision – lazy eye)
6.5% Accommodative Disorders (focusing problems)
If you combine myopia, astigmatism and amblyopia...
A traditional distance visual acuity test would ignore or pass 51% of children who would still have a significant vision problem.
The same study on 2,023 school-age patients found that the prevalence of accommodative and binocular disorders is 8.5 times greater than the prevalence of ocular disease in school-age children.
Scheiman M, Gallaway M, et al. Prevalence of vision and ocular disease conditions in a clinical pediatric population. J Am Optom Assoc 1996;67:193-202.

Robotic Therapy Shows Promise for Stroke Patients

...Even years after suffering a stroke, robot-assisted therapy may help stroke patients regain some of their physical abilities...

Children with hypertension have trouble with thinking, memory

...Children with high blood pressure are not as good at complicated, goal-directed tasks, have more working memory problems and are not as adept at planning as their peers without hypertension, according to recent research. If they are both hypertensive and obese, they are also more likely to have anxiety and depression....

Babies Born In Pollen And Mold Seasons Have Greater Odds Of Developing Asthma Symptoms

...Newborns whose first few months of life coincide with high pollen and mold seasons are at increased risk of developing early symptoms of asthma...

Ophthalmological Abnormalities In Children With Congenital Disorder Of Glycosylation Type I

Ophthalmic findings are frequent in CDG syndrome involving both the anterior and posterior segment of the eye. The disorder might lead to abnormal development of the lens or the retina, cause diminished vision, altered ocular motility and intraocular pressure. We suggest routine screening and follow-up for ophthalmological anomalies in all children diagnosed with CDG syndrome to provide early treatment and adequate counseling.

Ophthalmological Abnormalities In Children With Congenital Disorder Of Glycosylation Type I

Ophthalmic findings are frequent in CDG syndrome involving both the anterior and posterior segment of the eye. The disorder might lead to abnormal development of the lens or the retina, cause diminished vision, altered ocular motility and intraocular pressure. We suggest routine screening and follow-up for ophthalmological anomalies in all children diagnosed with CDG syndrome to provide early treatment and adequate counseling.

Ophthalmological Abnormalities In Children With Congenital Disorder Of Glycosylation Type I

Ophthalmic findings are frequent in CDG syndrome involving both the anterior and posterior segment of the eye. The disorder might lead to abnormal development of the lens or the retina, cause diminished vision, altered ocular motility and intraocular pressure. We suggest routine screening and follow-up for ophthalmological anomalies in all children diagnosed with CDG syndrome to provide early treatment and adequate counseling.

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Padres put hitters' vision to the test: Sports Vision in the News

...Padres slugger Greg Vaughn credited San Diego eye doctor Carl Hillier for helping him to shorten a hitting slump in 1998, and it was Hillier who put players through a battery of visual tests Wednesday.
“We're looking at the visual skills for athletic performance, and these go far beyond the ability to see 20-20,” said Hillier, who is part of the San Diego Center for Vision Care in Encinitas and Lemon Grove. “We're looking for ability, skill and endurance.” ...