Saturday, February 21, 2009

Intractable Migraines Improved by Nerve Stimulation

...Occipital nerve stimulation may be effective against refractory chronic migraine, researchers reported here....After three months of treatment in a randomized trial, 39% of patients with adjustable stimulation achieved clinically significant responses, compared with zero patients assigned to conventional medical management...

Some young stroke victims are misdiagnosed

...Younger adults arriving in hospital emergency rooms after a stroke are sometimes misdiagnosed with a range of conditions including vertigo and migraine headaches...

Several studies prove self-banning certain foods may cause food craving

...The results show that, when people prohibite themselves to consume certain foods because, for example, they think they are fattening, food craving arises as a reflection of the conflict between what "you can eat" and what "you do not want to eat"....

Comment: Great! I want dark chocolate, pinot noir wine and Macallan single malt Scotch (12 y/o or older). DM

Hefty Health Spending in Stimulus Bill

...The economic stimulus bill signed by President Obama contains more than $140 billion in health care spending, designed mostly to ease the recession's effects on workers and also to boost long-held goals of improving the nation's health information infrastructure....

Comments: It is sad that it takes a major crisis before support for health care becomes a priority. I just wonder....who's gonna pay for this? Will we be poor....because our government takes our money in taxes to pay for the stimulus package...but healthy? Will we be poor because of the inflation that is sure to follow all this government spending....but healthy? Will we be poor because our debt as a nation is so large....but healthy? I wish someone....anyone had actually read all thos 1000 + pages in the stimulus document before it was voted upon. Has anyone actually read it? DM

Friday, February 20, 2009

Register for Optometry's Meeting NOW. Click Here.

Do you want to write?

Do you want to write for peer-reviewed journal? Attend this AOA Optometry's meeting course. It's FREE!! You will love it. Dr. Freeman does a wonderful job! After you attend this course send in your papers to Dr. Freeman for the AOA journal and to ME for Optometry & Vision Development!

T331 — Writing for a Peer-Reviewed Journal
Lecturer(s): P. Freeman, O.D., Editor, Optometry: Journal of the American Optometric Association*Not for COPE credit
Saturday, 10:00am - 11:00am
Many people have knowledge to share and the ability to write, but can be intimidated by the publication process. This one-hour presentation will introduce the audience to writing for a peer-reviewed journal, hopefully removing the “fear of the unknown.” The expectations for writers and reviewers will be covered.

AOA Optometry's Meeting

I'm just in the process of registering for the AOA Optometry's Meeting this June and saw these great courses:

For Optometric Educators!

0210 — Optometric Educators’ Exchange
Lecturer(s): S. Cotter, O.D., F. Medio, Ph.D., K. Zadnik, O.D., Ph.D
Friday, 8:00am - 4:00pm
Now in its fourth year, the popular Optometric Educators’ Exchange (OEE) features an exciting slate of speakers and topics and a return of the popular 2008 program structure. The OEE begins with breakfast and a morning keynote address. The keynote is followed by two breakout sessions with time to network at roundtables. After the furnished lunch at noon, participants will hear the second keynote address, followed by a repeat of both morning breakouts. The day concludes with another hour of networking at roundtables. This flexible format allows educators to attend as many of the lectures as possible throughout the day. Yet the fee for the OEE remains a bargain at $25 for all or part of the day. The OEE’s schedule and content complements the popular Poster Session, allowing faculty members to attend both events.Welcome and Keynote SpeakerFranklin Medio, Ph.D., Consulting Services for the Health Professions Dr. Medio is a professional educator in a private independent consulting practice. From 1997 to 2007, he directed the GME office at the Medical University of South Carolina.Keynote #1 - “Teaching and Evaluating Professionalism: How to Effectively Give Critical Feedback”8:15amIn his morning keynote address, Dr. Medio will discuss how educators can best teach and evaluate professionalism in their students. This interactive lecture will include a section on how to give critical feedback.
Breakout #1:9:40am
Morning Roundtable Discussion:10:50am
Lunch:12:00pm – 12:45pm
Keynote #2 – “Remediation is NOT Punishment: How to Design an Appropriate Remediation Plan”12:45pm – 2:00pm
Learn six critical elements of an appropriate remedial learning contract and how to explain proper documentation needed to record performance.
Breakout #2:2:10pm
Afternoon Roundtable Discussion:3:20pm
Breakout Speakers
Susan Cotter, O.D., Southern California College of Optometry
“Research & Scholarly Activity for the Clinician: Why, How, and Who Cares?”
Dr. Cotter will offer information targeted specifically to clinicians about undertaking and publishing research in professional, peer-reviewed publications.
Karla Zadnik, O.D., Ph.D., The Ohio State University College of Optometry
"Professional Ethics: Can We Teach Students How to Do the Right Thing?"
Dr. Zadnik will discuss the importance of ethics with regard to teaching optometry students.

For Peds/BV Docs:
1712 — You Finished the Infant Exam - Now What?
Lecturer(s): G. Steele, O.D.
Thursday, 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Now that you have finished the exam on the baby, what do you do with the information? When do you prescribe for refractive cases, binocular cases, amblyogenic factors, and developmental issues? Clinical cases from each of these areas will be used as discussion points to provide guidelines for prescribing.

1215 — Risk Factors in Infants and Young Children
Lecturer(s): G. Steele, O.D.
Thursday, 3:00pm - 4:00pm
There are many signs and symptoms that present very early as risk factors. Unless they are identified early, the potential for problems increases with age. These babies must be carefully monitored to ensure proper development. Actual clinical cases will be used to demonstrate these issues.

3710 — The E(X)treme Sports Vision Practice
Lecturer(s): F. Edmunds, O.D.
Saturday, 10:00am - 12:00pm
Establishing an optometric practice devoted to sports vision (aka performance vision) is virtually unheard. Making it successful as a stand-alone specialty clinic, is even more rare. Survival depends on minimizing mistakes, making the right moves at the right times, and more than a modest amount of luck. One must have belief, passion, and perseverance to succeed. This course follows the development of a ‘sports vision only’ practice: identifying a suitable location, sourcing specialized equipment, setting up the physical clinic, creating forms, developing testing and training protocols, networking within the local athletic and eye care communities, and critically creating awareness about sports vision through smart, targeted promotion. Programs and ideas that worked, as well as plenty that didn’t, will be discussed. Finally, a business model for a successful ‘sports vision only’ practice will be presented for consideration.

4112 — Neuro-Optometric Rehabilitation: How to Serve the Growing Demand of Brain Injury Patients
Lecturer(s): C. Carman, O.D., M. Cron, O.D., B. Heinke Montecalvo, O.D.
Sunday, 8:00am - 12:00pm

This program provides the optometrist with a comprehensive overview of the epidemiology of the brain-injured and aging populations and the commonly encountered visual deficits. The practice impact for expanding patient care will be discussed, as well as the education and resources available. The evaluation and treatment processes will be described in relation to various neurological deficits. The importance of multidisciplinary collaboration will be emphasized, and select case studies will be presented.

and don't forget the POSTER Sessions!!

ICO "In The News"




Illinios College of Optometry
3241 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60616-3878

Illinois College of Optometry students receive a Jenzabar Foundation grant to impact underserved communities around the world
PRWeb, February 13, 2009

Even in this uncertain economy, Illinois College of Optometry (ICO) students are opening their hearts and wallets to volunteer for domestic and global humanitarian missions through Student Volunteers in Optometric Service to Humanity (SVOSH). These missions to underdeveloped communities around the world provide life-changing care for thousands of people in need and allow students to participate in restoring or improving vision while also exposing them to different cultures and diverse eye conditions. The cost of participation limits the number of students who can get involved, but The Jenzabar Foundation announces today that it will award a grant to aid ICO’s student chapter of SVOSH in an effort to subsidize the cost and support the humanitarian work of ICO students.

ICO’s Dr. Janice Jurkus has authored Chapter 22, Contact Lenses Practice Management, in the recently published text book 'Clinical Manual of Contact Lenses' by Bennett & Henry.

Dr. Sandy Block participated in the Special Olympics World Winter Games as a Global Clinical Advisor for the Special Olympics Lions Clubs International Opening Eyes program in Boise, Idaho, February 9-13, 2009.
At least 37% of athletes had not had an eye exam within the past 3 years or at all. More than 400 pairs of prescription glasses were provided to the athletes through grants from Essilor and Saffilo. Vice President Biden (pictured right with an athlete and Dr. Block) spent time learning about the services that were provided at no charge to the Special Olympic athletes.

State leaders consider board certification model
AOA News, February 2, 2009 – ICO's President Dr. Augsburger quoted

The Joint Board Certification Project Team (JBCPT), formed by six optometric organizations in 2007, released a model framework for a board certification process for optometry and began presenting it to leaders within the profession. At the core of the initial board certification program will be a Patient Assessment and Management-like examination that tests knowledge in core categories.

"It is vital to demonstrate to our patients, as well as to health care advocates, the federal government, and managed care programs, that a doctor of optometry meets high standards of competence," said Arol R. Augsburger, O.D., ASCO representative to the JBCPT. "The model we've proposed should help us determine how the profession can best meet those demands.”

Effectiveness of Base in Prism for Presbyopes with Convergence Insufficiency Optometry and Vision Science: Volume 86, February 2009, pp 153-156 ICO researchers: Drs. Bruce Teitelbaum and Yi Pang, along with Joseph Krall
Conclusions. The progressive addition glasses with BI-prism were found to be effective in alleviating symptoms of presbyopes with symptomatic CI.

ICO’s Rebecca Tudor was awarded the Grand Prize at the October 2008 Academy Ocular Photography Contest for a picture of Central Vein Occlusion. Organized by the Disease Section of the American Academy of Optometry, the Annual Ocular Photography Contest received 115 submissions.

Optometric Vision Therapy: Research

Optometric Vision Therapy (OVT) is not a new therapeutic intervention. It has been available for decades, but few have had the access needed. It usually includes the use of lenses, prism, bifocals, and structured therapeutic activities to facilitate the desired outcomes. This therapeutic approach has been successfully used for amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (eyes that turn in/out) and other binocular vision dysfunctions (convergence insufficiency/excess, divergence insufficiency/excess, accommodative dysfunctions (focusing), oculomotor anomalies (problems with saccades/pursuits/tracking).

Since these binocular vision dysfunctions have been linked to learning achievement, OVT is also used along with vision information processing therapy to not only improve vision function but academic performance.

Some say there is no research supporting what OVT offers...unfortunatley the majority of these skeptics never bother to seek out the research in the first place.

We have at least one clinical trial to support OVT (see the many articles generated by this clinical trial) and several papers generated by another clinical trial demonstrating that you can treat amblyopia at just about any age...(see PEDIG papers below as well).

The reseach supporting OVT and learning is there, but not quite as strong as those papers noted above....(see listing below)...

Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial Papers

Effectiveness of Placebo Therapy for Maintaining Masking in a Clinical Trial of Vergence/Accommodative Therapy.
Kulp MT, Mitchell GL, Borsting E, Scheiman M, Cotter S, Rouse M, Tamkins S, Mohney BG, Toole A, Reuter K, Citt SG.
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2009 Jan 17. [Epub ahead of print]

Randomized clinical trial of treatments for symptomatic convergence insufficiency in children.
Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial Study Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2008 Oct;126(10):1336-49.

Feasibility of using placebo vision therapy in a multicenter clinical trial.
Kulp MT, Borsting E, Mitchell GL, Scheiman M, Cotter S, Cooper J, Rouse M, London R, Wensveen J; Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) Investigator Group.
Optom Vis Sci. 2008 Apr;85(4):255-61.

The convergence insufficiency treatment trial: design, methods, and baseline data.
Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) Study Group.
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2008 Jan-Feb;15(1):24-36.

Accommodative insufficiency is the primary source of symptoms in children diagnosed with convergence insufficiency.
Scheiman M, Mitchell GL, Cotter S, Rouse M, Borsting E, Kulp M, Cooper J, London R, Wensveen J; Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) Study Group.
Optom Vis Sci. 2006 Nov;83(11):857-8; author reply 858-9. No abstract available.

Randomised clinical trial of the effectiveness of base-in prism reading glasses versus placebo reading glasses for symptomatic convergence insufficiency in children.
Scheiman M, Cotter S, Rouse M, Mitchell GL, Kulp M, Cooper J, Borsting E; Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial Study Group.
Br J Ophthalmol. 2005 Oct;89(10):1318-23.

A randomized clinical trial of treatments for convergence insufficiency in children.
Scheiman M, Mitchell GL, Cotter S, Cooper J, Kulp M, Rouse M, Borsting E, London R, Wensveen J; Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial Study Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2005 Jan;123(1):14-24.

Validity and reliability of the revised convergence insufficiency symptom survey in adults.
Rouse MW, Borsting EJ, Mitchell GL, Scheiman M, Cotter SA, Cooper J, Kulp MT, London R, Wensveen J; Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial Group.
Ophthalmic Physiol Opt. 2004 Sep;24(5):384-90.

Validity and reliability of the revised convergence insufficiency symptom survey in children aged 9 to 18 years.
Borsting EJ, Rouse MW, Mitchell GL, Scheiman M, Cotter SA, Cooper J, Kulp MT, London R; Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial Group.
Optom Vis Sci. 2003 Dec;80(12):832-8.

Other research/vision and learning:

The efficacy of visual therapy: accommodative disorders and non-strabismic anomalies of binocular vision.
Suchoff IB, Petito GT.
J Am Optom Assoc. 1986 Feb;57(2):119-25.

Vision, learning, and dyslexia. A joint organizational policy statement. American Academy of Optometry. American Optometric Association.
Optom Vis Sci. 1997 Oct;74(10):868-70.

The association between vision quality of life and academics as measured by the College of Optometrists in Vision Development Quality of Life questionnaire.
Vaughn W, Maples WC, Hoenes R.
Optometry. 2006 Mar;77(3):116-23.

Measuring ADHD behaviors in children with symptomatic accommodative dysfunction or convergence insufficiency: a preliminary study.
Borsting E, Rouse M, Chu R.
Optometry. 2005 Oct;76(10):588-92.

Visual factors that significantly impact academic performance.
Maples WC.
Optometry. 2003 Jan;74(1):35-49.

Vertical fixation disparity in learning disabled.
Sucher DF, Stewart J.
Optom Vis Sci. 1993 Dec;70(12):1038-43.

Learning disabilities and vision problems: are they related?
Keys MP, Silver LB.
Pediatrician. 1990;17(3):194-201.

A pilot study. Depth perception and near stereoacuity: is it related to academic performance in young children?
Kulp MT, Schmidt PP.
Binocul Vis Strabismus Q. 2002;17(2):129-34.

Is visual memory predictive of below-average academic achievement in second through fourth graders?
Kulp MT, Edwards KE, Mitchell GL.
Optom Vis Sci. 2002 Jul;79(7):431-4.

Effect of oculomotor and other visual skills on reading performance: a literature review.
Kulp MT, Schmidt PP.
Optom Vis Sci. 1996 Apr;73(4):283-92. Review.

Several Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group Generated Papers on Amblyopia

Amblyopia treatment: 1998 versus 2004.
Khazaeni L, Quinn GE, Davidson SL, Forbes BJ.
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2009 Jan-Feb;46(1):19-22; quiz 23-4.

Pharmacological plus optical penalization treatment for amblyopia: results of a randomized trial.
Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2009 Jan;127(1):22-30.

Patching vs atropine to treat amblyopia in children aged 7 to 12 years: a randomized trial.
Scheiman MM, Hertle RW, Kraker RT, Beck RW, Birch EE, Felius J, Holmes JM, Kundart J, Morrison DG, Repka MX, Tamkins SM; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2008 Dec;126(12):1634-42.

Further validation of the Amblyopia Treatment Index parental questionnaire.
Holmes JM, Strauber S, Quinn GE, Cole SR, Felius J, Kulp M; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
J AAPOS. 2008 Dec;12(6):581-4. Epub 2008 Oct 30.

A randomized trial of near versus distance activities while patching for amblyopia in children aged 3 to less than 7 years.
Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Ophthalmology. 2008 Nov;115(11):2071-8. Epub 2008 Sep 11.

Monocular oral reading performance after amblyopia treatment in children.
Repka MX, Kraker RT, Beck RW, Cotter SA, Holmes JM, Arnold RW, Astle WF, Sala NA, Tien DR; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Am J Ophthalmol. 2008 Dec;146(6):942-7. Epub 2008 Aug 16.

A randomized trial of atropine vs patching for treatment of moderate amblyopia: follow-up at age 10 years.
Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group, Repka MX, Kraker RT, Beck RW, Holmes JM, Cotter SA, Birch EE, Astle WF, Chandler DL, Felius J, Arnold RW, Tien DR, Glaser SR.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2008 Aug;126(8):1039-44.

Treatment of bilateral refractive amblyopia in children three to less than 10 years of age.
Wallace DK, Chandler DL, Beck RW, Arnold RW, Bacal DA, Birch EE, Felius J, Frazier M, Holmes JM, Hoover D, Klimek DA, Lorenzana I, Quinn GE, Repka MX, Suh DW, Tamkins S; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Am J Ophthalmol. 2007 Oct;144(4):487-96. Epub 2007 Aug 20.

The effect on refractive error of unilateral atropine as compared with patching for the treatment of amblyopia.
Repka MX, Melia M, Eibschitz-Tsimhoni M, London R, Magoon E; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
J AAPOS. 2007 Jun;11(3):300-2.

Treatment of strabismic amblyopia with refractive correction.
Cotter SA, Edwards AR, Arnold RW, Astle WF, Barnhardt CN, Beck RW, Birch EE, Donahue SP, Everett DF, Felius J, Holmes JM, Kraker RT, Melia BM, Repka MX, Wallace DK, Weise KK; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Am J Ophthalmol. 2007 Jun;143(6):1060-3.

Stability of visual acuity improvement following discontinuation of amblyopia treatment in children aged 7 to 12 years.
Hertle RW, Scheiman MM, Beck RW, Chandler DL, Bacal DA, Birch E, Chu RH, Holmes JM, Klimek DL, Lee KA, Repka MX, Weakley DR Jr; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2007 May;125(5):655-9.

Factors associated with recurrence of amblyopia on cessation of patching.
Holmes JM, Melia M, Bradfield YS, Cruz OA, Forbes B; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Ophthalmology. 2007 Aug;114(8):1427-32. Epub 2007 Mar 23.

A symptom survey and quality of life questionnaire for nasolacrimal duct obstruction in children.
Holmes JM, Leske DA, Cole SR, Chandler DL, Repka MX; Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction Questionnaire Study Group, Silbert DI, Tien DR, Bradley EA, Sala NA, Levin EM, Hoover DL, Klimek DL, Mohney BG, Laby DM, Lee KA, Enzenauer RW, Bacal DA, Mills MD, Beck RW; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Ophthalmology. 2006 Sep;113(9):1675-80. Epub 2006 Jul 7.

A randomized trial to evaluate 2 hours of daily patching for strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia in children.
Wallace DK; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group, Edwards AR, Cotter SA, Beck RW, Arnold RW, Astle WF, Barnhardt CN, Birch EE, Donahue SP, Everett DF, Felius J, Holmes JM, Kraker RT, Melia M, Repka MX, Sala NA, Silbert DI, Weise KK.
Ophthalmology. 2006 Jun;113(6):904-12.

Treatment of anisometropic amblyopia in children with refractive correction.
Cotter SA; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group, Edwards AR, Wallace DK, Beck RW, Arnold RW, Astle WF, Barnhardt CN, Birch EE, Donahue SP, Everett DF, Felius J, Holmes JM, Kraker RT, Melia M, Repka MX, Sala NA, Silbert DI, Weise KK.
Ophthalmology. 2006 Jun;113(6):895-903.

The effect of amblyopia therapy on ocular alignment.
Repka MX, Holmes JM, Melia BM, Beck RW, Gearinger MD, Tamkins SM, Wheeler DT; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
J AAPOS. 2005 Dec;9(6):542-5.

A randomized pilot study of near activities versus non-near activities during patching therapy for amblyopia.
Holmes JM, Edwards AR, Beck RW, Arnold RW, Johnson DA, Klimek DL, Kraker RT, Lee KA, Lyon DW, Nosel ER, Repka MX, Sala NA, Silbert DI, Tamkins S; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
J AAPOS. 2005 Apr;9(2):129-36.

Randomized trial of treatment of amblyopia in children aged 7 to 17 years.
Scheiman MM, Hertle RW, Beck RW, Edwards AR, Birch E, Cotter SA, Crouch ER Jr, Cruz OA, Davitt BV, Donahue S, Holmes JM, Lyon DW, Repka MX, Sala NA, Silbert DI, Suh DW, Tamkins SM; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2005 Apr;123(4):437-47.

Two-year follow-up of a 6-month randomized trial of atropine vs patching for treatment of moderate amblyopia in children.
Repka MX, Wallace DK, Beck RW, Kraker RT, Birch EE, Cotter SA, Donahue S, Everett DF, Hertle RW, Holmes JM, Quinn GE, Scheiman MM, Weakley DR; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2005 Feb;123(2):149-57.

A randomized trial of atropine regimens for treatment of moderate amblyopia in children.
Repka MX, Cotter SA, Beck RW, Kraker RT, Birch EE, Everett DF, Hertle RW, Holmes JM, Quinn GE, Sala NA, Scheiman MM, Stager DR Sr, Wallace DK; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Ophthalmology. 2004 Nov;111(11):2076-85.


Risk of amblyopia recurrence after cessation of treatment.
Holmes JM, Beck RW, Kraker RT, Astle WF, Birch EE, Cole SR, Cotter SA, Donahue S, Everett DF, Hertle RW, Keech RV, Paysse E, Quinn GF, Repka MX, Scheiman MM; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
J AAPOS. 2004 Oct;8(5):420-8.

Recent advances in the treatment of amblyopia.
Quinn GE, Beck RW, Holmes JM, Repka MX; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):1800-2. No abstract available.

A prospective, pilot study of treatment of amblyopia in children 10 to <18>
Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Am J Ophthalmol. 2004 Mar;137(3):581-3.

Impact of patching and atropine treatment on the child and family in the amblyopia treatment study.
Holmes JM, Beck RW, Kraker RT, Cole SR, Repka MX, Birch EE, Felius J, Christiansen SP, Coats DK, Kulp MT; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2003 Nov;121(11):1625-32.

A randomized trial of prescribed patching regimens for treatment of severe amblyopia in children.
Holmes JM, Kraker RT, Beck RW, Birch EE, Cotter SA, Everett DF, Hertle RW, Quinn GE, Repka MX, Scheiman MM, Wallace DK; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Ophthalmology. 2003 Nov;110(11):2075-87.

The course of moderate amblyopia treated with atropine in children: experience of the amblyopia treatment study.
Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Am J Ophthalmol. 2003 Oct;136(4):630-9.

The course of moderate amblyopia treated with patching in children: experience of the amblyopia treatment study.
Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Am J Ophthalmol. 2003 Oct;136(4):620-9.

A comparison of atropine and patching treatments for moderate amblyopia by patient age, cause of amblyopia, depth of amblyopia, and other factors.
Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Ophthalmology. 2003 Aug;110(8):1632-7; discussion 1637-8.

A randomized trial of patching regimens for treatment of moderate amblyopia in children.
Repka MX, Beck RW, Holmes JM, Birch EE, Chandler DL, Cotter SA, Hertle RW, Kraker RT, Moke PS, Quinn GE, Scheiman MM; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2003 May;121(5):603-11.

Clinical research in pediatric ophthalmology: the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Beck RW.
Curr Opin Ophthalmol. 2002 Oct;13(5):337-40. Review.

The clinical profile of moderate amblyopia in children younger than 7 years.
Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2002 Mar;120(3):281-7.

A randomized trial of atropine vs. patching for treatment of moderate amblyopia in children.
Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group..
Arch Ophthalmol. 2002 Mar;120(3):268-78.

The amblyopia treatment study visual acuity testing protocol.
Holmes JM, Beck RW, Repka MX, Leske DA, Kraker RT, Blair RC, Moke PS, Birch EE, Saunders RA, Hertle RW, Quinn GE, Simons KA, Miller JM; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
Arch Ophthalmol. 2001 Sep;119(9):1345-53.

The Amblyopia Treatment Index.
Cole SR, Beck RW, Moke PS, Celano MP, Drews CD, Repka MX, Holmes JM, Birch EE, Kraker RT, Kip KE; Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group.
J AAPOS. 2001 Aug;5(4):250-4.

Academic Performance and Binocular Vision Dysfunctions/Vision Information Process

Saccade Control in Dyslexia: Development, Deficits, Training and Transfer to Reading Burkhart Fischer, Dipl Phys; Klaus Hartnegg, Dipl Phys
Optometry and Vision Development Volume 39, No. 4, 2008

Computerized Saccadic Eye Movement Therapy to Improve Oculomotor Control during Reading and Reading Rate in Adult Japanese Readersby Tomohito Okumura, MScOptom, MEd, FCOVD, FAAO, et. al.
Optometry and Vision Development Volume 39, No. 4, 2008

Filtered Text and Direction Discrimination Training Improved Reading Fluency for Both Dyslexic and Normal Readers Teri Lawton, PhD
Optometry and Vision Development Volume 39, No. 3, 2008

Subitizing and Visual Counting in Children with Problems in Acquiring Basic Arithmetic Skills Burkhart Fischer, Dipl. Phys., Christine Gebhardt, Dipl. Phys., and Klaus Hartnegg, Dipl. Phys.
Optometry and Vision Development Volume 39, No. 1, 2008

Effects of Daily Practice on Subitizing, Visual Counting, and Basic Arithmetic Skills Burkhart Fischer, Dipl. Phys., Christine Gebhardt, Dipl. Phys., and Klaus Hartnegg, Dipl. Phys.
Optometry and Vision Development Volume 39, No. 1, 2008

The Impact of Vergence and Accommodative Therapy on Reading Eye Movements and Reading Speedby Michael Gallaway, OD, FCOVD and Mark B. Boas, OD, MS
Optometry and Vision Development Volume 38, No. 3, 2007

Evaluating Changes in Quality of Life After Vision Therapy Using the COVD Quality of Life Outcomes Assessment by Kelly M. Daugherty, OD, et. al.
Optometry and Vision Development Volume 38, No. 2, 2007

The Effects of HTS Vision Therapy Conducted in a School Setting on Reading Skills in Third and Fourth Grade Students David Goss, O.D., Ph.D., FAAO, FCOVD-A, et. al.
Optometry and Vision Development Volume 38, No. 1, 2007

A Study of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Skill Therapy Delivered in a Video Game Format Don Helms, O.D., and Sara M. Sawtelle, Ph.D.
Optometry and Vision Development Volume 38, No. 1, 2007

Training Direction-Discrimination Sensitivity Remediates a Wide Spectrum of Reading Skills Teri Lawton, Ph.D.
Optometry and Vision Development Volume 38, No. 1, 2007

Is there a common linkage among reading comprehension, visual attention, and magnocellular processing?
Solan HA, Shelley-Tremblay JF, Hansen PC, Larson S.
J Learn Disabil. 2007 May-Jun;40(3):270-8.

M-cell deficit and reading disability: a preliminary study of the effects of temporal vision-processing therapy.
Solan HA, Shelley-Tremblay J, Hansen PC, Silverman ME, Larson S, Ficarra A.
Optometry. 2004 Oct;75(10):640-50.

Visual deficits and dyslexia.
Solan HA.
J Learn Disabil. 1999 Jul-Aug;32(4):282-3. No abstract available.

Role of visual attention in cognitive control of oculomotor readiness in students with reading disabilities.
Solan HA, Larson S, Shelley-Tremblay J, Ficarra A, Silverman M.
J Learn Disabil. 2001 Mar-Apr;34(2):107-18.

Effect of attention therapy on reading comprehension.
Solan HA, Shelley-Tremblay J, Ficarra A, Silverman M, Larson S.
J Learn Disabil. 2003 Nov-Dec;36(6):556-63.

Coherent motion threshold measurements for M-cell deficit differ for above- and below-average readers.
Solan HA, Hansen PC, Shelley-Tremblay J, Ficarra A.
Optometry. 2003 Nov;74(11):727-34.

Eye movements and speed reading.
Solan HA.
J Am Optom Assoc. 1999 Jul;70(7):435. No abstract available.

Eye movement efficiency in normal and reading disabled elementary school children: effects of varying luminance and wavelength.
Solan HA, Ficarra A, Brannan JR, Rucker F.
J Am Optom Assoc. 1998 Jul;69(7):455-64.

Effect of luminance on visual evoked potential amplitudes in normal and disabled readers.
Brannan JR, Solan HA, Ficarra AP, Ong E.
Optom Vis Sci. 1998 Apr;75(4):279-83.

Frequency of convergence insufficiency in optometry clinic settings. Convergence Insufficiency and Reading Study (CIRS) Group.
Rouse MW, Hyman L, Hussein M, Solan H.
Optom Vis Sci. 1998 Feb;75(2):88-96.

Transient and sustained processing: effects of varying luminance and wavelength on reading comprehension.
Solan HA, Brannan JR, Ficarra A, Byne R.
J Am Optom Assoc. 1997 Aug;68(8):503-10.
PMID: 9279050 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Dyslexia and learning disabilities: an overview.
Solan HA.
Optom Vis Sci. 1993 May;70(5):343-7. Review.

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Troubling Trend In Early Education - All Work And No Play

...Parents and educators who favor traditional classroom-style learning over free, unstructured playtime in preschool and kindergarten may actually be stunting a child's development instead of enhancing it....

Comments: Get the kids outside! Reduce myopia! Improve development! A kids work IS PLAY!! Let 'em play! DM

Mediterranean Diet Associated With Lower Risk Of Cognitive Impairment

...Eating a Mediterranean diet appears to be associated with less risk of mild cognitive impairment a stage between normal aging and dementia or of transitioning from mild cognitive impairment into Alzheimer's disease...

Brain-Injured Patients Can Relearn Emotions, And Regain Ability To Understand Facial Expressions

...Interpreting and expressing emotion are defining characteristics of being human. The psychiatric rehabilitation community confirmed in recent years that as many as 50 percent of TBI patients had lost this ability. In the past, people with TBI who reacted inappropriately, such as joking at a funeral, or didn't react at all, were considered to have behavior problems. This capacity to understand and respond to emotions now is known as affect recognition. ...

Rett Syndrome: Study Suggests Molecule Can Reverse Some Symptoms

....A molecule that promotes brain development could serve as a possible treatment for Rett syndrome, the most common form of autism in girls....

Nimble Activity Protects Against Mild Cognitive Impairment

...Middle-age and older adults who prefer a mental workout to passive activities, such as watching TV, may be less likely to develop memory loss as they age...

Eye tracking technology: A fresh approach in delirium assessment?

...The potential of ETT for direct clinical applications in the assessment of attention and comprehension, key cognitive symptoms of delirium, are promising. This paper considers potential new approaches which recent advancements in non-invasive ETT may bring to the examination and understanding of delirium. ...

Comments: What's this? The Intermational Review of Psychiatry believes that eye tracking has something to do with attention and comprehension? Awesome! DM

Continuing Education Courses at the Illinois College of Optometry

Continuing Education Courses at the Illinois College of Optometry

Sunday March 1st, 2009

Featured Speakers:
Kenneth Ciuffreda, OD, PhD, FAAO, FCOVD-A
ICO's Dr. & Mrs. Dominick M. Maino Visiting Professor
Professor at SUNY College of Optometry

Christine Allison, OD, FAAO, FCOVD
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Illinois College of Optometry

Featured Topics:
Acquired/Traumatic Brain Injury
Refractive Error Development
The Kindergarten Exam

All courses include parking, continental breakfast, course materials, and certificate of attendance.

Tests will be in multiple-choice format and are optional. The tests will be given on-site. One re-take will be permitted.

All courses are COPE pending.

Contact:
Diane D. Gillette
Continuing Education Coordinator
Illinois College of Optometry
Phone: 312-949-7081
Fax: 312-949-7383
Email: dgillette@ico.edu

http://www.ico.edu/alumni/springclasses.html

Six Ways to Boost Brainpower

Scientific American notes that there are at least six ways to use neuroplasticity to improve your brain power. These include: EXERCISE, DIET, the use of STIMULANTS, playing VIDEO GAMES, MUSIC, and MEDITATION.

Let's see....I do use stimulants (coffee), I do use video games (VT video games that is!), and I'm deeply involved in music and the arts (photography)...so now all I need do is exercise, diet and chill out!

Yeah, like that's gonna happen!! Click on the title above to read the article. DM

Scientific American Articles

Scientific American has an article (The Folds of the Brain--And Their Links to Autism) about how the forces that shape the brain could aid in the diagnosis and treatment of autism, schizophrenia and other mental disorders and another article on Lazy Eye Treatments Provide New Insight on Brain Plasticity Studies which shows how adult brains can demonstrate neuroplasticity. Click on the titles indicated for the full text of each article. DM

Vaccines and Autism

Many of the parents of the children we see have questions these days about vaccines and if they are appropriate for their children because of various fears. One of these fears is that vaccines can cause Autism. The Vaccine Court has recently noted that there is no merit to claims that Thimerosal in vaccines or the MMR vaccine contributed to Autism in children.

When should children have their vaccinations? The American Academy of Pediatrics suggestions the following: Childhood Schedule, Adolescent Schedule, and a Catch Up Schedule. By the way, did you know that adults need to get vaccinations too? Click here to see what is recommended for adults. Scroll down to see what shots you should consider getting as a health care provider! DM

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Prenatal Exposure to Pollution Linked to Future Asthma

...Researchers examined umbilical cord blood from New York City infants and discovered evidence of a possible new biomarker associated with prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are chemical compounds that are created as byproducts of incomplete combustion from carbon-containing fuels. There are typically high levels of PAHs in heavily trafficked areas, and exposure to the chemicals have been linked to diseases such as cancer and childhood asthma....

Tuesday, February 17, 2009

Autism and Vaccines

Vaccine Court: No Merit to Claims That Thimerosal in Vaccines Contributed to Autism... The federal "vaccine court" has rejected claims that either the measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine or thimerosal in vaccines caused children's autism....

REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AT SIGNING OF CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAM LEGISLATION

THE PRESIDENT: All right. Please, everybody have a seat. This is good. This is good. (Laughter and applause.) Today, with one of the first bills that I sign -- reauthorizing the Children's Health Insurance Program -- we fulfill one of the highest responsibilities that we have: to ensure the health and well-being of our nation's children.It's a responsibility that's only grown more urgent as our economic crisis deepens, as health care costs have exploded and millions of working families are unable to afford health insurance. Today in America, 8 million children are still uninsured -- more than 45 million Americans altogether. ...

Vision Care for Kids Act of 2009

The Secretary, acting through the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, may award grants to States on the basis of an established review process for the purpose of complementing existing State efforts for--
`(1) providing comprehensive eye examinations by a licensed optometrist or ophthalmologist for children who have been previously identified through a vision screening or eye examination by a licensed health care provider or vision screener as needing such services, with priority given to children who are under the age of 9 years;
`(2) providing treatment or services, subsequent to the examinations described in paragraph (1), necessary to correct vision problems; and
`(3) developing and disseminating, to parents, teachers, and health care practitioners, educational materials on recognizing signs of visual impairment in children.

Is the Incidence of Infantile Esotropia Declining?

The incidence of infantile esotropia in this population has not significantly changed from 1965 through 1994. Moreover, the rate of surgical intervention over these years is similar for this patient population.

Prescription Pain Medicine Spending by Outpatients Soars Over 10 Years

...Outpatient spending on prescription painkillers more than tripled in a decade, rising to $13.2 billion in 2006 from $4.2 billion in 1996, researchers here reported. ...In 2006, the average price of each prescription for a painkiller was $57, compared with $26 a decade earlier, the brief found. This led to an annual expense for such patients of $232, up from $83. There was no difference in the proportion of men (16.0% and 16.0%) or women (21.9% and 21.9%) purchasing at least one outpatient prescription analgesic when comparing the years 1996 and 2006. ...Some 230.7 million patients in 2006 filled at least one prescription compared with 163.6 million in 1996. Still, the proportion of the population filling a painkiller prescription remained steady at 19% for both years. ...

Comments: There are many more painkillers used now than ever. There are meds that originally not used to "kill" pain and are now Rx'd for neuropathy of all kinds. Take a look at Lyrica and Topomax. DM

Students help 'Focus' W. Phila. children's vision

...Zion and 20 students from his day care class at the West Philadelphia Community Center, located at 36th Street and Haverford Avenue, participated in vision screenings last Thursday morning as part of Focus First, a Penn community service initiative. Six Penn students operated a camera that tests for vision problems and eased the anxiety of the 2- and 3-year-olds in the process....

Comments: So college kids are now doing vision screenings? I wonder what they tell parents after they do the screening? What is astigmatism anyway? DM

AOA commends President Obama's attention to children's vision

...The American Optometric Association (AOA) commended President Barack Obama for singling out the importance of eye and vision care when he signed the expansion of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP).... "No child should be falling behind at school because he can't hear the teacher or see the blackboard. I refuse to accept that millions of our children fail to reach their full potential because we fail to meet their basic needs," said President Obama as he signed the bill into law during a White House ceremony on Wednesday...

Comments: Watch your wallets! I wonder who is going to pay for this? DM

Health Careers Chronicle

Illinois College of Optometry Summer Program

The Illinois College of Optometry will again host the Focus on Your Future Summer Program for underrepresented minority undergraduate students. The program is a weeklong experience that will expose undergraduate students to the profession of optometry in a variety of settings. Participants will have the opportunity to meet and work with current optometry students, ICO Faculty & Staff, as well as practicing optometrists.

Students will be housed at no charge in our Residential Complex. There is no cost to participate in this program. Participants are responsible for their travel expenses and/or transportation cost to and from ICO.
Program Dates: Monday, July 6 - Friday, July 10, 2009Application Period: March 2 - April 3, 2009Notification: Applicants will be notified on or about May 1, 2009.

For eligibility and application information, visit http://
www.ico.edu/prospectivestudents/newsummerprogram.html. Please feel free to contact me if you and/or your students have any questions.

Using your natural binocular vision reduces eyestrain and helps you shoot better

...Different sight systems demand that the eyes do different things, but whatever system you use, shooting with both eyes open will help you hit the mark. ...

From Rifle Shooter Magazine

Cash-strapped Optometry Students Give Back in a Big Way

....Even in this uncertain economy, Illinois College of Optometry (ICO) students are opening their hearts and wallets to volunteer for domestic and global humanitarian missions through Student Volunteers in Optometric Service to Humanity (SVOSH). These missions to underdeveloped communities around the world provide life-changing care for thousands of people in need and allow students to participate in restoring or improving vision while also exposing them to different cultures and diverse eye conditions. The cost of participation limits the number of students who can get involved, but The Jenzabar Foundation announces today that it will award a grant to aid ICO's student chapter of SVOSH in an effort to subsidize the cost and support the humanitarian work of ICO students.

Comments: I'm an ICO grad and faculty member....so I do not pretend that I'm not biased....this is typical of our students....they are bright and giving. Oh yeah....did I mention that they also had a better than 95% pass rate on part 2 of the NBEO!!! DM

Writers who want to Self Publish!

...As traditional publishers look to prune their booklists and rely increasingly on blockbuster best sellers, self-publishing companies are ramping up their title counts and making money on books that sell as few as five copies, in part because the author, rather than the publisher, pays for things like cover design and printing costs....

Comment: Since many publishers are discontinuing Peds/BV texts, maybe we should all self-publish!! DM

Highly Accurate Vision Screening Tool That Identifies Vision Problems Early in Life

Launched publicly just last October, PediaVision today announced being used in 15 states throughout the U.S. and growing rapidly. Why the rapid growth? Because people are learning that one out of every four children in the U.S. suffers from a vision problem -- 7.7 million children under age 11. And since 95 percent of vision problems can be corrected if caught early, parents and Pediatricians are thrilled to find a vision screening tool that identifies vision problems early in life -- even before children can speak

Treatment of vision Problems secondary to serious pathology.

FYI...

Treatment of vision Problems secondary to serious pathology.
Helping people to function better with vision loss.

Save $300 by registering Now! Great conference rate of $395 good until February 28, 2009Special conference hotel rate of $89.00/ night which includes breakfast.

Call now to reserve your spot. 623-516-0010

Course Location34225 N. 27th Drive - Bldg #3Phoenix, AZ 85085

This location has a 35 seat conference room

Opportunity to observe a functioning alternative practice
Hands on activity to establish your confidence
The course goal is to give you the expertise and confidence to begin using these therapies in your practice immediately.

For more information 1-800-430-9328
Info@healingtheeye.com

Ophthalmologic Findings in Children With Sensorineural Hearing Loss

...In this study, the overall prevalence of ophthalmologic findings in children with SNHL was 21.7%. Ophthalmologic anomalies were present in 3.7% of children with GJB2 mutations. Routine ophthalmologic examination can be beneficial in the evaluation of children with SNHL. ...

Comment: PDF available by clicking on title above. Somehow 21% of the population showing vision problems seems low to me. They did not evaluate the presence of non-strabismic binocular disfunction (No CI,, CE, DI, DE ...no accommodative assessments...nor did they assess oculomotor functional skills.) The mean age at the time of diagnosis was 37 months....I don't think they gave us a range of age or SD.. DM

Long-term follow-up of children with benign abducens nerve palsy

...Conclusions: Our data support earlier findings, such as painless and predominately left-sided occurrence, spontaneous recovery within 6 months, and ipsilateral recurrence. In contrast to much of the literature, we did not find a female preponderance. Exclusion of severe causes and close follow-up is mandatory for these patients. As none of the patients developed long-term recurrences or neurological sequelae, this entity can be regarded as a benign condition without malignant associations or complications...

Sunday, February 15, 2009

Cognitive Training Can Alter Biochemistry Of The Brain

...Researchers at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet have shown for the first time that the active training of the working memory brings about visible changes in the number of dopamine receptors in the human brain. The study, which is published in the journal Science, was conducted with the help of PET scanning and provides deeper insight into the complex interplay between cognition and the brain's biological structure....

Part-time occlusion therapy for amblyopia in older children

...All grades of part-time occlusion are comparable to full-time occlusion in effectiveness of treatment for mild to moderate amblyopia in children between 7-12 years of age unlike in severe amblyopia, where six hours and full-time occlusion were more effective than two hours occlusion therapy....

Full text of article is available. DM

Attacking Autism: Doctors Debate the Cause

Less than 10 years ago, one in 250 children was diagnosed with a form of autism. Today, that number is one in 150. For boys, it's one in 94. To get to the bottom of the disorder, we must first know the cause........

Federal Vaccine Court Rejects MMR-Autism Link in Three Cases

Vaccines did not cause three children to develop autism, according to separate decisions issued today in the federal "vaccine court."

Special masters in the Court of Federal Claims, which hears cases of people seeking payments from the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, ruled that the parents of three autistic children had failed to demonstrate that MMR vaccination was responsible.

"To conclude that [the child's] condition was the result of his MMR vaccine, an objective observer would have to emulate Lewis Carroll's White Queen and be able to believe six impossible (or, at least, highly improbable) things before breakfast," wrote master Denise Vowell in her decision in one of the three cases....